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AEM Forms can be invoked by using the AEM Forms Java API. When using the AEM Forms Java API, you can use either the Invocation API or Java client libraries. Java client libraries are available for services such as the Rights Management service. These strongly typed APIs let you develop Java applications that invoke AEM Forms.

The Invocation API are classes that are located in the com.adobe.idp.dsc package. Using these classes, you can send an invocation request directly to a service and handle an invocation response that is returned. Use the Invocation API to invoke short-lived or long-lived processes that were created by using Workbench.

The recommended way to programmatically invoke a service is to use a Java client library that corresponds to the service as opposed to the Invocation API. For example, to invoke the Encryption service, use the Encryption service client library. To perform an Encryption service operation, invoke a method that belongs to the Encryption service client object. You can encrypt a PDF document with a password by invoking the EncryptionServiceClient object’s encryptPDFUsingPassword method.

The Java API supports the following features:

  • RMI transport protocol for remote invocation

  • VM transport for local invocation

  • SOAP for remote invocation

  • Different authentication, such as user name and password

  • Synchronous and asynchronous invocation requests

Adobe Developer website

The Adobe Developer website contains the following articles that discuss invoking AEM Forms services using the Java API:

Using Java servlets to invoke AEM Forms processes

Invoking the AEM Forms Distiller API from Java

See also

Including AEM Forms Java library files

To programmatically invoke a AEM Forms service by using the Java API, include required library files (JAR files) in your Java project’s classpath. The JAR files that you include in your client application’s classpath depend on several factors:

  • The AEM Forms service to invoke. A client application can invoke one or more services.

  • The mode in which you want to invoke a AEM Forms service. You can use the EJB or SOAP mode. (See Setting connection properties.)

  • The J2EE application server on which AEM Forms is deployed.

Service-specific JAR files

The following table lists the JAR files that are required to invoke AEM Forms services.

File

Description

Location

adobe-livecycle-client.jar

Must always be included in a Java client application’s class path.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-usermanager-client.jar

Must always be included in a Java client application’s class path.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-utilities.jar

Must always be included in a Java client application’s class path.

<install directory>/sdk//client-libs/<app server>

adobe-applicationmanager-client-sdk.jar

Required to invoke the Application Manager service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-assembler-client.jar

Required to invoke the Assembler service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-backup-restore-client-sdk.jar

Required to invoke the Backup and Restore service API.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-barcodedforms-client.jar

Required to invoke the barcoded forms service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-convertpdf-client.jar

Required to invoke the Convert PDF service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-distiller-client.jar

Required to invoke the Distiller service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-docconverter-client.jar

Required to invoke the DocConverter service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-contentservices-client.jar

Required to invoke the Document Management service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-encryption-client.jar

Required to invoke the Encryption service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-forms-client.jar

Required to invoke the Forms service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-formdataintegration-client.jar

Required to invoke the Form Data Integration service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-generatepdf-client.jar

Required to invoke the Generate PDF service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-generate3dpdf-client.jar

Required to invoke the Generate 3D PDF service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-jobmanager-client-sdk.jar

Required to invoke the Job Manager service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-output-client.jar

Required to invoke the Output service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-pdfutility-client.jar

Required to invoke the PDF Utilities or XMP Utilities service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-reader-extensions-client.jar

Required to invoke the Acrobat Reader DC extensions service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-repository-client.jar

commons-codec-1.3.jar

Required to invoke the Repository service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs\thirdparty

  • adobe-rightsmanagement-client.jar

  • namespace.jar

  • jaxb-api.jar

  • jaxb-impl.jar

  • jaxb-libs.jar

  • jaxb-xjc.jar

  • relaxngDatatype.jar

  • xsdlib.jar

Required to invoke the Rights Management service.

If AEM Forms is deployed on JBoss, include all these files.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

JBoss-specific lib directory

adobe-signatures-client.jar

Required to invoke the Signature service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-taskmanager-client-sdk.jar

Required to invoke the Task Manager service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

adobe-truststore-client.jar

Required to invoke the Trust Store service.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/common

Connection mode and J2EE application JAR files

The following table lists the JAR files that are dependant upon the connection mode and the J2EE application server on which AEM Forms is deployed.

File

Description

Location

  • activation.jar

  • axis.jar

  • commons-codec-1.3.jar

  • commons-collections-3.1.jar

  • commons-discovery.jar

  • commons-logging.jar

  • dom3-xml-apis-2.5.0.jar

  • jaxen-1.1-beta-9.jar

  • jaxrpc.jar

  • log4j.jar

  • mail.jar

  • saaj.jar

  • wsdl4j.jar

  • xalan.jar

  • xbean.jar

  • xercesImpl.jar
  • commons-httpclient-3.1.jar

 

if AEM Forms is invoked using the SOAP mode, include these JAR files.

<install directory>/sdk/client-libs/thirdparty

jbossall-client.jar

if AEM Forms is deployed on JBoss Application Server, include this JAR file.

The size of jbossall-client.jar is significantly lesser in JBoss 5.1.0. This is because JBoss 4.2.1 jbossall-client.jar packages all the classes required to connect to JBoss 4.2.1 server. However, JBoss 5.1.0 jbossall-client.jar does not package any classes. This jar file contains a classpath reference to various client jar files used by the JBoss client applications.

When writing AEM Forms API-based programs where AEM Forms is running on JBoss 5.2.1, you must place jbossall-client.jar and all the referenced jars in a single folder and then include jbossall-client.jar in the classpath.

Required classes will not be found by the classloader if jbossall-client.jar and the referenced jars are not co-located.

JBoss client lib directory

If you deploy your client application on the same J2EE application server, you do not need to include this file.

  • jacorb.jar

  • jnp-client.jar

if AEM Forms is deployed on JBoss Application Server, include this JAR file.

JBoss client lib directory

If you deploy your client application on the same J2EE application server, you do not need to include this file.

wlclient.jar

if AEM Forms is deployed on BEA WebLogic Server®, then include this JAR file.

WebLogic-specific lib directory

If you deploy your client application on the same J2EE application server, you do not need to include this file.

  • com.ibm.ws.admin.client_6.1.0.jar

  • com.ibm.ws.webservices.thinclient_6.1.0.jar

  • if AEM Forms is deployed on WebSphere Application Server, include these JAR files.

  • (com.ibm.ws.webservices.thinclient_6.1.0.jar is required for web service invocation).

WebSphere-specific lib directory ([WAS_HOME]/runtimes)

If you deploy your client application on the same J2EE application server, you do not have to include these files.

Invoking scenarios

The following table specifies invoking scenarios and lists the required JAR files to successfully invoke AEM Forms.

Services

Invocation mode

J2EE application server

Required JAR files

Forms service

EJB

JBoss

  • adobe-livecycle-client.jar

  • adobe-usermanager-client.jar

  • jbossall-client.jar

  • jacorb.jar

  • jnp-client.jar

  • adobe-forms-client.jar

Forms service

Acrobat Reader DC extensions service

Signature service

EJB

JBoss

  • adobe-livecycle-client.jar

  • adobe-usermanager-client.jar

  • jbossall-client.jar

  • jacorb.jar

  • jnp-client.jar

  • adobe-forms-client.jar

  • adobe-reader-extensions-client.jar

  • adobe-signatures-client.jar

Forms service

SOAP

WebLogic

  • adobe-livecycle-client.jar

  • adobe-usermanager-client.jar

  • wlclient.jar

  • activation.jar

  • axis.jar

  • commons-codec-1.3.jar

  • commons-collections-3.1.jar

  • commons-discovery.jar

  • commons-logging.jar

  • dom3-xml-apis-2.5.0.jar

  • jai_imageio.jar

  • jaxen-1.1-beta-9.jar

  • jaxrpc.jar

  • log4j.jar

  • mail.jar

  • saaj.jar

  • wsdl4j.jar

  • xalan.jar

  • xbean.jar

  • xercesImpl.jar

  • adobe-forms-client.jar

Forms service

Acrobat Reader DC extensions service

Signature service

SOAP

WebLogic

  • adobe-livecycle-client.jar

  • adobe-usermanager-client.jar

  • wlclient.jar

  • activation.jar

  • axis.jar

  • commons-codec-1.3.jar

  • commons-collections-3.1.jar

  • commons-discovery.jar

  • commons-logging.jar

  • dom3-xml-apis-2.5.0.jar

  • jai_imageio.jar

  • jaxen-1.1-beta-9.jar

  • jaxrpc.jar

  • log4j.jar

  • mail.jar

  • saaj.jar

  • wsdl4j.jar

  • xalan.jar

  • xbean.jar

  • xercesImpl.jar

  • adobe-forms-client.jar

  • adobe-reader-extensions-client.jar

  • adobe-signatures-client.jar

Upgrading JAR files

If you are upgrading from LiveCycle to AEM Forms, it is recommeded that you include the AEM Forms JAR files in your Java project’s class path. For example, if you are using services such as the Rights Management service, you will encounter a compatibility issue if you do not include AEM Forms JAR files in your class path.

Assuming that you are upgrading to AEM Forms. To use a Java application that invokes the Rights Management service, include the AEM Forms versions of the following JAR files:

  • adobe-rightsmanagement-client.jar

  • adobe-livecycle-client.jar

  • adobe-usermanager-client.jar

See also

Setting connection properties

You set connection properties to invoke AEM Forms when using the Java API. When setting connection properties, specify whether to invoke services remotely or locally, and also specify the connection mode and authentication values. Authentication values are required if service security is enabled. However, if service security is disabled, it is not necessary to specify authentication values. (See Disabling Service Security.)

The connection mode can either be SOAP or EJB mode. The EJB mode uses the RMI/IIOP protocol, and the performance of the EJB mode is better than the performance of the SOAP mode. The SOAP mode is used to eliminate a J2EE application server dependency or when a firewall is located between AEM Forms and the client application. The SOAP mode uses the https protocol as the underlying transport and can communicate across firewall boundaries. If neither a J2EE application server dependency or a firewall is an issue, it is recommended that you use the EJB mode.

To successfully invoke a AEM Forms service, set the following connection properties:

  • DSC_DEFAULT_EJB_ENDPOINT: If you are using the EJB connection mode, this value represents the URL of the J2EE application server on which AEM Forms is deployed. To remotely invoke AEM Forms, specify the J2EE application server name on which AEM Forms is deployed. If your client application is located on the same J2EE application server, then you can specify localhost. Depending on which J2EE application server AEM Forms is deployed on, specify one of the following values:

    • JBoss: http://<ServerName>:8080 (default port)

    • WebSphere: iiop://<ServerName>:2809 (default port)

    • WebLogic: t3://<ServerName>:7001 (default port)

  • DSC_DEFAULT_SOAP_ENDPOINT: If you are using the SOAP connection mode, this value represents the endpoint to where an invocation request is sent. To remotely invoke AEM Forms, specify the J2EE application server name on which AEM Forms is deployed. If your client application is located on the same J2EE application server, you can specify localhost (for example, http://localhost:8080.)

    • The port value 8080 is applicable if the J2EE application is JBoss. If the J2EE application server is IBM® WebSphere®, use port 9080. Likewise, if the J2EE application server is WebLogic, use port 7001. (These values are default port values. If you change the port value, use the applicable port number.)

  • DSC_TRANSPORT_PROTOCOL: If you are using the EJB connection mode, specify ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_EJB_PROTOCOL for this value. If you are using the SOAP connection mode, specify ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_SOAP_PROTOCOL.

  • DSC_SERVER_TYPE: Specifies the J2EE application server on which AEM Forms is deployed. Valid values are JBoss, WebSphere, WebLogic.

    • If you set this connection property to WebSphere, the java.naming.factory.initial value is set to com.ibm.ws.naming.util.WsnInitCtxFactory.

    • If you set this connection property to WebLogic, the java.naming.factory.initial value is set to weblogic.jndi.WLInitialContextFactory.

    • Likewise, if you set this connection property to JBoss, the java.naming.factory.initial value is set to org.jnp.interfaces.NamingContextFactory.

    • You can set the java.naming.factory.initial property to a value that meets your requirements if you do not want to use the default values.

    Note: Instead of using a string to set the DSC_SERVER_TYPE connection property, you can use a static member of the ServiceClientFactoryProperties class. The following values can be used: ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_WEBSPHERE_SERVER_TYPE, ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_WEBLOGIC_SERVER_TYPE, or ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_JBOSS_SERVER_TYPE.

  • DSC_CREDENTIAL_USERNAME: Specifies the AEM forms user name. For a user to sucessfully invoke a AEM Forms service, they need the Services User role. A user can also have another role that includes the Service Invoke permission. Otherwise, an exception is thrown when they attempt to invoke a service. If service security is disabled, it is not necessary to specify this connection property. (See Disabling Service Security.)

  • DSC_CREDENTIAL_PASSWORD: Specifies the corresponding password value. If service security is disabled, it is not necessary to specify this connection property.

  • DSC_REQUEST_TIMEOUT: The default request timeout limit for the SOAP request is 1200000 milliseconds (20 minutes). Sometime, a request can require longer time to complete the operation. For example, a SOAP request that retrieves a large set of records can require a longer timeout limit. You can use the ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_REQUEST_TIMEOUT to increase the request call timeout limit for the SOAP requests.

    note: Only SOAP-based invocations support the DSC_REQUEST_TIMEOUT property.

To set connection properties, perform the following tasks:

  1. Create a java.util.Properties object by using its constructor.

  2. To set the DSC_DEFAULT_EJB_ENDPOINT connection property, invoke the java.util.Properties object’s setProperty method and pass the following values:

    • The ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_DEFAULT_EJB_ENDPOINT enumeration value

    • A string value that specifies the URL of the J2EE application server that hosts AEM Forms

    Bemærk:

    If you are using the SOAP connection mode, specify the ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_DEFAULT_SOAP_ENDPOINT enumeration value instead of the ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_DEFAULT_EJB_ENDPOINT enumeration value.

  3. To set the DSC_TRANSPORT_PROTOCOL connection property, invoke the java.util.Properties object’s setProperty method and pass the following values:

    • The ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_TRANSPORT_PROTOCOL enumeration value

    • The ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_EJB_PROTOCOL enumeration value

    Bemærk:

    If you are using the SOAP connection mode, specify the ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_SOAP_PROTOCOL enumeration value instead of the ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_EJB_PROTOCOL enumeration value.

  4. To set the DSC_SERVER_TYPE connection property, invoke the java.util.Properties object’s setProperty method and pass the following values:

    • The ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_SERVER_TYPE enumeration value

    • A string value that specifies the J2EE application server that hosts AEM Forms (for example, if AEM Forms is deployed on JBoss, specify JBoss).

      1. To set the DSC_CREDENTIAL_USERNAME connection property, invoke the java.util.Properties object’s setProperty method and pass the following values:

    • The ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_CREDENTIAL_USERNAME enumeration value

    • A string value that specifies the user name required to invoke AEM Forms

      1. To set the DSC_CREDENTIAL_PASSWORD connection property, invoke the java.util.Properties object’s setProperty method and pass the following values:

    • The ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_CREDENTIAL_PASSWORD enumeration value

    • A string value that specifies the corresponding password value

Setting the EJB connection mode

The following Java code example sets connection properties to invoke AEM Forms deployed on JBoss and using the EJB connection mode.

 Properties ConnectionProps = new Properties(); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_DEFAULT_EJB_ENDPOINT, "http://localhost:8080"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_TRANSPORT_PROTOCOL,ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_EJB_PROTOCOL);           
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_SERVER_TYPE, "JBoss"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_CREDENTIAL_USERNAME, "administrator"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_CREDENTIAL_PASSWORD, "password");

Setting the EJB connection mode for WebLogic

The following Java code example sets connection properties to invoke AEM Forms deployed on WebLogic and using the EJB connection mode.

 Properties ConnectionProps = new Properties(); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_DEFAULT_EJB_ENDPOINT, "t3://localhost:7001"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_TRANSPORT_PROTOCOL,ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_EJB_PROTOCOL);           
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_SERVER_TYPE, "WebLogic"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_CREDENTIAL_USERNAME, "administrator"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_CREDENTIAL_PASSWORD, "password");

Setting the EJB connection mode for WebSphere

The following Java code example sets connection properties to invoke AEM Forms deployed on WebSphere and using the EJB connection mode.

 Properties ConnectionProps = new Properties(); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_DEFAULT_EJB_ENDPOINT, "iiop://localhost:2809"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_TRANSPORT_PROTOCOL,ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_EJB_PROTOCOL);           
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_SERVER_TYPE, "WebSphere"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_CREDENTIAL_USERNAME, "administrator"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_CREDENTIAL_PASSWORD, "password");

Setting the SOAP connection mode

The following Java code example sets connection properties in SOAP mode to invoke AEM Forms deployed on JBoss.

 Properties ConnectionProps = new Properties(); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_DEFAULT_SOAP_ENDPOINT, "http://localhost:8080"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_TRANSPORT_PROTOCOL,ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_SOAP_PROTOCOL);           
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_SERVER_TYPE, "JBoss"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_CREDENTIAL_USERNAME, "administrator"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_CREDENTIAL_PASSWORD, "password");

Bemærk:

If you select the SOAP connection mode, ensure to include additional JAR files in your client application’s class path.

Setting connection properties when service security is disabled

The following Java code example sets connection properties required to invoke AEM Forms deployed on JBoss Application Server and when service security is disabled. (See Disabling Service Security.)

 Properties ConnectionProps = new Properties(); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_DEFAULT_EJB_ENDPOINT, "jnp://localhost:1099"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_TRANSPORT_PROTOCOL,ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_EJB_PROTOCOL);           
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_SERVER_TYPE, "JBoss");

Bemærk:

All Java Quick Starts associated with Programming with AEM Forms show both EJB and SOAP connection settings.

Setting the SOAP connection mode with custom request timeout limit

 Properties ConnectionProps = new Properties(); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_DEFAULT_SOAP_ENDPOINT, "http://localhost:8080"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_TRANSPORT_PROTOCOL,ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_SOAP_PROTOCOL);           
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_SERVER_TYPE, "JBoss"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_CREDENTIAL_USERNAME, "administrator"); 
 ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_CREDENTIAL_PASSWORD, "password"); 
ConnectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_REQUEST_TIMEOUT, "1800000"); // Request timeout limit 30 Minutes

Using a Context object to invoke AEM Forms

You can use a com.adobe.idp.Context object to invoke a AEM Forms service with an authenticated user (the com.adobe.idp.Context object represents an authenticated user). When using a com.adobe.idp.Context object, you do not need to set the DSC_CREDENTIAL_USERNAME or DSC_CREDENTIAL_PASSWORD properties. You can obtain a com.adobe.idp.Context object when authenicating users by using the AuthenticationManagerServiceClient object’s authenticate method.

The authenticate method returns an AuthResult object that contains the results of the authentication. You can create a com.adobe.idp.Context object by invoking its constructor. Then invoke the com.adobe.idp.Context object’s initPrincipal method and pass the AuthResult object, as shown in the following code:

 Context myCtx = new Context();  
 myCtx.initPrincipal(authResult);

Instead of setting the DSC_CREDENTIAL_USERNAME or DSC_CREDENTIAL_PASSWORD properties, you can invoke the ServiceClientFactory object’s setContext method and pass the com.adobe.idp.Context object. When using a AEM forms user to invoke a service, ensure that they have the role named Services User that is required to invoke a AEM Forms service.

The following code example shows how to use a com.adobe.idp.Context object within connection settings that are used to create an EncryptionServiceClient object.

 //Authenticate a user and use the Context object within connection settings 
 // Authenticate the user 
 String username = "wblue"; 
 String password = "password"; 
 AuthResult authResult = authClient.authenticate(username, password.getBytes()); 
  
 //Set a Content object that represents the authenticated user 
 //Use the Context object to invoke the Encryption service 
 Context myCtx = new Context();  
 myCtx.initPrincipal(authResult); 
  
 //Set connection settings 
 Properties connectionProps = new Properties(); 
 connectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_DEFAULT_EJB_ENDPOINT, "jnp://hiro-xp:1099"); 
 connectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_TRANSPORT_PROTOCOL, ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_EJB_PROTOCOL); 
 connectionProps.setProperty(ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_SERVER_TYPE, ServiceClientFactoryProperties.DSC_JBOSS_SERVER_TYPE); 
                          
 //Create a ServiceClientFactory object 
 ServiceClientFactory myFactory = ServiceClientFactory.createInstance(connectionProps); 
 myFactory.setContext(myCtx); 
                          
 //Create an EncryptionServiceClient object 
 EncryptionServiceClient encryptClient  = new EncryptionServiceClient(myFactory);

Bemærk:

For complete details about authenticating a user, see Authenticating Users.

Invoking scenarios

The following invoking scenarios are discussed in this section:

  • A client application running in its own Java virtual machine (JVM) invokes a stand-alone AEM Forms instance.

  • A client application running in its own JVM invokes clustered AEM Forms instances.

Client application invoking a stand-alone AEM Forms instance

The following diagram shows a client application running in its own JVM and invoking a stand-alone AEM Forms instance.

In this scenario, a client application is running in its own JVM and invokes AEM Forms services.

Bemærk:

This scenario is the invoking scenario on which all Quick Starts are based.

Client application invoking clustered AEM Forms instances

The following diagram shows a client application running in its own JVM and invoking AEM Forms instances located in a cluster.

This scenario is similar to a client application invoking a stand-alone AEM Forms instance. However, the provider URL is different. If a client application wants to connect to a specific J2EE application server, the application must change the URL to reference the specific J2EE application server.

Referencing a specific J2EE application server is not recommended because the connection between the client application and AEM Forms is terminated if the application server stops. It is recommended that the provider URL reference a cell-level JNDI manager, instead of a specific J2EE application server.

Client applications that use the SOAP connection mode can use the HTTP load balancer port for the cluster. Client applications that use the EJB connection mode can connect to the EJB port of a specific J2EE application server. This action handles the Load Balancing between cluster nodes.

WebSphere

The following example shows the contents of a jndi.properties file that is used to connect to AEM Forms that is deployed on WebSphere.

 java.naming.factory.initial=com.ibm.websphere.naming. 
 WsnInitialContextFactory 
 java.naming.provider.url=corbaloc::appserver1:9810,:appserver2:9810

WebLogic

The following example shows the contents of a jndi.properties file that is used to connect to AEM Forms that is deployed on WebLogic.

 java.naming.factory.initial=weblogic.jndi.WLInitialContextFactory 
 java.naming.provider.url=t3://appserver1:8001, appserver2:8001

JBoss

The following example shows the contents of a jndi.properties file that is used to connect to AEM Forms that is deployed on JBoss.

 java.naming.factory.initial= org.jnp.interfaces.NamingContextFactory 
 java.naming.provider.url= jnp://appserver1:1099, appserver2:1099, 
 appserver3:1099

Bemærk:

Consult your administrator to determine the J2EE application server name and port number.

See also

Passing data to AEM Forms services using the Java API

AEM Forms service operations typically consume or produce PDF documents. When you invoke a service, sometimes it is necessary to pass a PDF document (or other document types such as XML data) to the service. Likewise sometimes it is necessary to handle a PDF document that is returned from the service. The Java class that enables you to pass data to and from AEM Forms services is com.adobe.idp.Document.

AEM Forms services do not accept a PDF document as other data types, such as a java.io.InputStream object or a byte array. A com.adobe.idp.Document object can also be used to pass other types of data, such as XML data, to services.

A com.adobe.idp.Document object is a Java serializable type, so it can be passed over an RMI call. The receiving side can be collocated (same host, same class loader), local (same host, different class loader), or remote (different host). Passing of document content is optimized for each case. For example, if the sender and receiver are located on the same host, the content is passed over a local file system. (In some cases, documents can be passed in memory.)

Depending on the com.adobe.idp.Document object size, the data is carried within the com.adobe.idp.Document object or stored on the server's file system. Any temporary storage resources occupied by the com.adobe.idp.Document object are removed automatically upon the com.adobe.idp.Document disposal. (See Disposing Document objects.)

Sometimes it is necessary to know the content type of a com.adobe.idp.Document object before you can pass it to a service. For example, if an operation requires a specific content type, such as application/pdf, it is recommended that you determine the content type. (See Determining the content type of a document.)

The com.adobe.idp.Document object attempts to determine the content type using the supplied data. If the content type cannot be retrieved from the data supplied (for example, when the data was supplied as a byte array), set the content type. To set the content type, invoke the com.adobe.idp.Document object’s setContentType method. (See Determining the content type of a document)

If collateral files reside on the same file system, creating a com.adobe.idp.Document object is faster. If collateral files reside on remote file systems, a copy operation must be done, which affects performance.

An application can contain both com.adobe.idp.Document and org.w3c.dom.Document data types. However, ensure that you fully qualify the org.w3c.dom.Document data type. For information about converting a org.w3c.dom.Document object to a com.adobe.idp.Document object, see Quick Start (EJB mode): Prepopulating Forms with Flowable Layouts using the Java API.

Bemærk:

To prevent a memory leak in WebLogic while using a com.adobe.idp.Document object, read the document information in chunks of 2048 bytes or less. For example, the following code reads the document information in chunks of 2048 bytes:

        // Set up the chunk size to prevent a potential memory leak 
        int buffSize = 2048; 
  
        // Determine the total number of bytes to read 
        int docLength = (int) inDoc.length(); 
        byte [] byteDoc = new byte[docLength]; 
  
        // Set up the reading position 
        int pos = 0; 
  
        // Loop through the document information, 2048 bytes at a time 
        while (docLength > 0) { 
      // Read the next chunk of information 
            int toRead = Math.min(buffSize, docLength); 
            int bytesRead = inDoc.read(pos, byteDoc, pos, toRead); 
  
            // Handle the exception in case data retrieval failed 
            if (bytesRead == -1) { 
  
                inDoc.doneReading(); 
                inDoc.dispose(); 
                throw new RuntimeException("Data retrieval failed!"); 
  
            } 
  
             // Update the reading position and number of bytes remaining 
             pos += bytesRead; 
             docLength -= bytesRead; 
  
        } 
  
        // The document information has been successfully read 
        inDoc.doneReading(); 
        inDoc.dispose();

See also

Creating documents

Create a com.adobe.idp.Document object before you invoke a service operation that requires a PDF document (or other document types) as an input value. The com.adobe.idp.Document class provides constructors that enable you to create a document from the following content types:

  • A byte array

  • An existing com.adobe.idp.Document object

  • A java.io.File object

  • A java.io.InputStream object

  • A java.net.URL object

Creating a document based on a byte array

The following code example creates a com.adobe.idp.Document object that is based on a byte array.

Creating a Document object that is based on a byte array

 Document myPDFDocument = new Document(myByteArray);

Creating a document based on another document

The following code example creates a com.adobe.idp.Document object that is based on another com.adobe.idp.Document object.

Creating a Document object that is based on another document

 //Create a Document object based on a byte array 
 InputStream is = new FileInputStream("C:\\Map.pdf"); 
 int len = is.available(); 
 byte [] myByteArray = new byte[len]; 
 int i = 0; 
 while (i < len) { 
       i += is.read(myByteArray, i, len); 
 } 
 Document myPDFDocument = new Document(myByteArray); 
  
 //Create another Document object 
 Document anotherDocument = new Document(myPDFDocument);

Creating a document based on a file

The following code example creates a com.adobe.idp.Document object that is based on a PDF file named map.pdf. This file is located in the root of the C hard drive. This constructor attempts to set the MIME content type of the com.adobe.idp.Document object using the filename extension.

The com.adobe.idp.Document constructor that accepts a java.io.File object also accepts a Boolean parameter. By setting this parameter to true, the com.adobe.idp.Document object deletes the file. This action means that you do not have to remove the file after passing it to the com.adobe.idp.Document constructor.

Setting this parameter to false means that you retain ownership of this file. Setting this parameter to true is more efficient. The reason is because the com.adobe.idp.Document object can move the file directly to the local managed area instead of copying it (which is slower).

Creating a Document object that is based on a PDF file

 //Create a Document object based on the map.pdf source file 
 File mySourceMap = new File("C:\\map.pdf"); 
 Document myPDFDocument = new Document(mySourceMap,true);

Creating a document based on an InputStream object

The following Java code example creates a com.adobe.idp.Document object that is based on a java.io.InputStream object.

Creating a document based on an InputStream object

 //Create a Document object based on an InputStream object 
 InputStream is = new FileInputStream("C:\\Map.pdf"); 
 Document myPDFDocument = new Document(is);

Creating a document based on content accessible from an URL

The following Java code example creates a com.adobe.idp.Document object that is based on a PDF file named map.pdf. This file is located within a web application named WebApp that is running on localhost. This constructor attempts to set the com.adobe.idp.Document object’s MIME content type using the content type returned with the URL protocol.

The URL supplied to the com.adobe.idp.Document object is always read at the side where the original com.adobe.idp.Document object is created, as shown in this example:

     Document doc = new Document(new java.net.URL("file:c:/temp/input.pdf"));

The c:/temp/input.pdf file must be located on the client computer (not on the server computer). The client computer is where the URL is read and where the com.adobe.idp.Document object was created.

Creating a document based on content accessible from an URL

 //Create a Document object based on a java.net.URL object 
 URL myURL = new URL("http", "localhost", 8080,"/WebApp/map.pdf");  
          
 //Create another Document object 
 Document myPDFDocument = new Document(myURL);

See also

Handling returned documents

Service operations that return a PDF document (or other data types such as XML data) as an output value return a com.adobe.idp.Document object. After you receive a com.adobe.idp.Document object, you can convert it to the following formats:

  • A java.io.File object

  • A java.io.InputStream object

  • A byte array

The following line of code converts a com.adobe.idp.Document object to a java.io.InputStream object. Assume that myPDFDocument represents a com.adobe.idp.Document object:

     java.io.InputStream resultStream = myDocument.getInputStream();

Likewise, you can copy the contents of a com.adobe.idp.Document to a local file by performing the following tasks:

  1. Create a java.io.File object.

  2. Invoke the com.adobe.idp.Document object’s copyToFile method and pass the java.io.File object.

The following code example copies the contents of a com.adobe.idp.Document object to a file named AnotherMap.pdf.

Copying the contents of a document object to a file

 File outFile = new File("C:\\AnotherMap.pdf"); 
 myDocument.copyToFile (outFile);

See also

Determining the content type of a document

Determine the MIME type of a com.adobe.idp.Document object by invoking the com.adobe.idp.Document object’s getContentType method. This method returns a string value that specifies the content type of the com.adobe.idp.Document object. The following table describes the different content types that AEM Forms returns.

MIME type

Description

application/pdf

PDF document

application/vnd.adobe.xdp+xml

XML Data Packaging (XDP), which is used for exported XML Forms Architecture (XFA) forms

text/xml

Bookmarks, attachments, or other XML documents

application/vnd.fdf

Forms Data Format (FDF), which is used for exported Acrobat forms

application/vnd.adobe.xfdf

XML Forms Data Format (XFDF), which is used for exported Acrobat forms

application/rdf+xml

Rich data format and XML

application/octet-stream

Generic data format

NULL

Unspecified MIME type

The following code example determines the content type of a com.adobe.idp.Document object.

Determining the content type of a Document object

 //Determine the content type of the Document object 
 String ct = myDocument.getContentType(); 
 System.out.println("The content type of the Document object is " +ct);

See also

Disposing Document objects

When you no longer require a Document object, it is recommended that you dispose of it by invoking its dispose method. Each Document object consumes a file descriptor and as much as 75 MB of RAM space on your application’s host platform. If a Document object is not disposed, then the Java Garage collection process disposes it. However, by disposing of it sooner by using the dispose method, you can free the memory occupied by the Document object.

See also

Invoking a service using a Java client library

AEM Forms service operations can be invoked by using a service’s strongly typed API, which is known as a Java client library. A Java client library is a set of concrete classes that provide access to services deployed in the service container. You instantiate a Java object that represents the service to invoke instead of creating an InvocationRequest object by using the Invocation API. The Invocation API is used to invoke processes, such as long-lived processes, created in Workbench. (See Invoking Human-Centric Long-Lived Processes.)

To perform a service operation, invoke a method that belongs to the Java object. A Java client library contains methods that typically map one-to-one with service operations. When using a Java client library, set required connection properties. (See Setting connection properties.)

After you set connection properties, create a ServiceClientFactory object that is used to instantiate a Java object that lets you invoke a service. Each service that has a Java client library has a corresponding client object. For example, to invoke the Repository service, create a ResourceRepositoryClient object by using its constructor and passing the ServiceClientFactory object. The ServiceClientFactory object is responsible for maintaining connection settings that are required to invoke AEM Forms services.

Although obtaining a ServiceClientFactory is typically fast, some overhead is involved when the factory is first used. This object is optimized for reuse and therefore, when possible, use the same ServiceClientFactory object when you are creating multiple Java client objects. That is, do not create a separate ServiceClientFactory object for each client library object that you create.

There is a User Manager setting that controls the lifetime of the SAML assertion that is inside the com.adobe.idp.Context object that affects the ServiceClientFactory object. This setting controls all authentication context lifetimes throughout AEM Forms, including all invocations performed by using the Java API. By default, the time period in which a ServiceCleintFactory object can be used is two hours.

Bemærk:

To explain how to invoke a service by using the Java API, the Repository service’s writeResource operation is invoked. This operation places a new resource into the repository.

You can invoke the Repository service by using a Java client library and by performing the following steps:

  1. Include client JAR files, such as the adobe-repository-client.jar, in your Java project’s class path. For information about the location of these files, see Including AEM Forms Java library files.

  2. Set connection properties that are required to invoke a service.

  3. Create a ServiceClientFactory object by invoking the ServiceClientFactory object’s static createInstance method and passing the java.util.Properties object that contains connection properties.

  4. Create a ResourceRepositoryClient object by using its constructor and passing the ServiceClientFactory object. Use the ResourceRepositoryClient object to invoke Repository service operations.

  5. Create a RepositoryInfomodelFactoryBean object by using its constructor and pass null. This object lets you create a Resource object that represents the content that is added to the repository.

  6. Create a Resource object by invoking the RepositoryInfomodelFactoryBean object’s newImage method and passing the following values:

    • A unique ID value by specifying new Id().

    • A unique UUID value by specifying new Lid().

    • The name of the resource. You can specify the file name of the XDP file.

    Cast the return value to Resource.

  7. Create a ResourceContent object by invoking the RepositoryInfomodelFactoryBean object’s newImage method and casting the return value to ResourceContent. This object represents the content that is added to the repository.

  8. Create a com.adobe.idp.Document object by passing a java.io.FileInputStream object that stores the XDP file to add to the repository. (See Creating a document based on an InputStream object.)

  9. Add the content of the com.adobe.idp.Document object to the ResourceContent object by invoking the ResourceContent object’s setDataDocument method. Pass the com.adobe.idp.Document object.

  10. Set the MIME type of the XDP file to add to the repository by invoking the ResourceContent object’s setMimeType method and passing application/vnd.adobe.xdp+xml.

  11. Add the content of the ResourceContent object to the Resource object by invoking the Resource object ‘s setContent method and passing the ResourceContent object.

  12. Add a description of the resource by invoking the Resource object ‘s setDescription method and passing a string value that represents a description of the resource.

  13. Add the form design to the repository by invoking the ResourceRepositoryClient object’s writeResource method and passing the following values:

    • A string value that specifies the path to the resource collection that contains the new resource

    • The Resource object that was created

See also

Invoking a short-lived process using the Invocation API

You can invoke a short-lived process using the Java Invocation API. When you invoke a short-lived process using the Invocation API, you pass required parameter values by using a java.util.HashMap object. For each parameter to pass to a service, invoke the java.util.HashMap object’s put method and specify the name-value pair that is required by the service in order to perform the specified operation. Specify the exact name of the parameters that belong to the short-lived process.

Bemærk:

For information about invoking a long-lived process, see Invoking Human-Centric Long-Lived Processes.

The discussion here is about using Invocation API to invoke the following AEM Forms short-lived process named MyApplication/EncryptDocument.

Bemærk:

This process is not based on an existing AEM Forms process. To follow along with the code example, create a process named MyApplication/EncryptDocument using Workbench. (See Using Workbench.)

When this process is invoked, it performs the following actions:

  1. Obtains the unsecured PDF document that is passed to the process. This action is based on the SetValue operation. The input parameter for this process is a document process variable named inDoc.

  2. Encrypts the PDF document with a password. This action is based on the PasswordEncryptPDF operation. The password encrypted PDF document is returned in a process variable named outDoc.

Invoke the MyApplication/EncryptDocument short-lived process using the Java invocation API

Invoke the MyApplication/EncryptDocument short-lived process using the Java invocation API:

  1. Include client JAR files, such as the adobe-livecycle-client.jar, in your Java project’s class path. (See Including AEM Forms Java library files.)

  2. Create a ServiceClientFactory object that contains connection properties. (See Setting connection properties.)

  3. Create a ServiceClient object by using its constructor and passing the ServiceClientFactory object. A ServiceClient object lets you invoke a service operation. It handles tasks such as locating, dispatching, and routing invocation requests.

  4. Create a java.util.HashMap object by using its constructor.

  5. Invoke the java.util.HashMap object’s put method for each input parameter to pass to the long-lived process. Because the MyApplication/EncryptDocument short-lived process requires one input parameter of type Document, you only have to invoke the put method once, as shown in the following example.

     //Create a Map object to store the parameter value for inDoc 
     Map params = new HashMap(); 
     InputStream inFile = new FileInputStream("C:\\Adobe\Loan.pdf"); 
     Document inDoc = new Document(inFile); 
     params.put("inDoc", inDoc);
  6. Create an InvocationRequest object by invoking the ServiceClientFactory object’s createInvocationRequest method and passing the following values:

    • A string value that specifies the name of the long-lived process to invoke. To invoke the MyApplication/EncryptDocument process, specify MyApplication/EncryptDocument.

    • A string value that represents the process operation name. Typically the name of a short-lived process operation is invoke.

    • The java.util.HashMap object that contains the parameter values that the service operation requires.

    • A Boolean value that specifies true, which creates a synchronous request (this value is applicable to invoke a short-lived process).

  7. Send the invocation request to the service by invoking the ServiceClient object’s invoke method and passing the InvocationRequest object. The invoke method returns an InvocationReponse object.

    Bemærk:

    A long-lived process can be invoked by passing the value false as the fourth parameter of the createInvocationRequest method. Passing the value false creates an asynchronous request.

  8. Retrieve the process’s return value by invoking the InvocationReponse object’s getOutputParameter method and passing a string value that specifies the name of the output parameter. In this situation, specify outDoc (outDoc is the name of the output parameter for the MyApplication/EncryptDocument process). Cast the return value to Document, as shown in the following example.

     InvocationResponse response = myServiceClient.invoke(request); 
     Document encryptDoc = (Document) response.getOutputParameter("outDoc");
  9. Create a java.io.File object and ensure that the file extension is .pdf.

  10. Invoke the com.adobe.idp.Document object’s copyToFile method to copy the contents of the com.adobe.idp.Document object to the file. Ensure that you use the com.adobe.idp.Document object that was returned by the getOutputParameter method.

See also

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