Adobe InDesign CC

Wrap text around objects

Learn how to wrap text around simple objects and shapes. Customize the text flow to prevent unsightly gaps or visual breaks from appearing in the layout. (Try it, 10 min)

What do I need?

Get files Sample files to practice with (ZIP, 504 KB)

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Step 1 of 7:

Step up your workspace

With the sample file open to Page 1, choose the Typography workspace from the Workspace switcher menu in the top-right corner of the application window. This opens all panels that are useful for working with type.

Select the Text Wrap panel in the Panel dock on the right. You can also open the Text Wrap panel by choosing Window > Text Wrap.


Step 2 of 7:

Wrap text around a bounding box

You’ll see a vector object Q overlapping a text frame filled with text. Choose the Selection tool in the Tools panel and click the vector object to select it. In the Text Wrap panel, select the second icon, Wrap around bounding box. The text will automatically align to the bounding box around the vector object. To undo text wrap, select the first icon, No text wrap.

 

Step 3 of 7:

Jump an object

In some cases, you may want the text to skip over the object altogether. Select the fourth icon, Jump object to achieve this effect. The text will now jump the object and continue to flow under it.

Step 4 of 7:

Wrap text around an object’s shape

With the vector object still selected, select the third option, Wrap around object shape. Under Wrap Options, choose Wrap to > Both Right and Left sides. Now, the filler text automatically wraps around the contour of the vector object instead of its bounding box.

You’ll notice that some text also flows through the interior contours of the vector object. We will amend this in the next steps.

Tip: If you don't see Wrap Options in the Text Wrap panel, click the panel options and choose Show options.

 

Step 5 of 7:

Adjust text wrap offset values

You can control the space between the object and its text wrap. With the text wrapped around the object, click the up-facing arrow to set a Top Offset value. You can also type in a value. This adds padding around the object; as you increase the value in this field, the text is offset, or pushed farther away from the object.


Step 6 of 7:

Left side or right side

If your layout demands it, you can have the text flow on just one side of the object. With the vector object selected, under Wrap Options, choose Wrap to > Right side. The text flows accordingly, although you may still see some text in the inside contours of the vector object. Choose Wrap to > Largest Area to push text away from the object’s contours.

Step 7 of 7:

Try creating these text wrap effects on your own

Use these instructions to format pages 2-3 of this document:

A. On page 3, format the vector object J as an initial drop cap at the beginning of the article. Wrap text along its right contour. Make sure no text appears inside the shape’s contours.

B. In the middle column, you’ll find a swash that functions as a section separator. Flow text around this swash so it jumps, or skips over the shape altogether.

C. For the pull quote occupying the middle and right columns, wrap text on all sides and adjust the offset values to create sufficient padding all around it.

 

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