Don’t let your location slow you down. Shoot photos in Adobe DNG format to have more control editing your photos from your mobile device wherever you are.
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Reasons to shoot in Adobe DNG

Often, our pictures don’t look like what we actually saw when we shot them. The default file format when taking pictures is typically JPG or TIFF, both of which have limited editing options.

Adobe DNG is a raw file format that is uncompressed. So right away, you have a higher quality image than a JPG or TIFF, while also having greater editing capabilities to get the look you want.

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Take a raw photo with your phone

Capture a picture in Adobe DNG format from Lightroom on your mobile device and edit your photos anywhere.

Open the Lightroom app and tap the camera icon. If your device supports it, make sure the File Format is set to DNG. Tap the Capture button to take the picture.

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Edit your photos

Tap on a photo and tap Edit to open the editing controls. Swipe the control bar below the image until you see the adjustment you want to make, then tap to select it.

For example, use the Shadows slider to bring out details in under-exposed areas of the photo. Adjust the white balance to make the colors look like they do in real life. Change the temperature so the lighting more closely matches the indoor or outdoor lighting of the scene. Add vibrance to a color-muted sky. Or, remove haze, increase clarity, make colors more vivid, and so on. You can also use the Local Adjust option to modify specific areas of the photo — such as to increase clarity in the sky.

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You created something cool. Now share it.

Be sure to share your work so others can enjoy it. To share your image, tap the Share icon, select Open In, choose the appropriate Image Size, and share on social media.

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09/19/2016

Contributor: Elia Locardi

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