Learn how to apply Clarity and Dehaze, add a vignette, reduce noise, and sharpen your photos in Lightroom CC.

Apply Clarity

Apply a Clarity adjustment to enhance midtone contrast in a photo in Lightroom CC.

 

What you learned: Use the Clarity adjustment

  1. With a photo selected, click the Edit icon in the column on the right.
  2. In the Effects panel, drag the Clarity slider to the right to increase midtone contrast and sharpness, bringing out detail in midtone areas.
  3. Drag the Clarity slider to the left to decrease midtone contrast and sharpness, for a softening effect.

 

Reduce haze

Use the unique Dehaze adjustment to reduce or add haze in a photo in Lightroom CC.

 

What you learned: Use the Dehaze adjustment

  1. With a photo selected, click the Edit icon in the column on the right.
  2. In the Effects panel, drag the Dehaze slider to the right to cut through haze or mist in a scene to reveal more detail and color. If this increases color saturation more than you’d like, in the Color panel drag the Saturation or Vibrance slider to the left.
  3. Drag the Dehaze slider to the left to increase haze in a photo.

 

Add a vignette

Darken or lighten the edges of a photo with a vignette in Lightroom CC.

 

What you learned: Add a vignette

  1. With a photo selected, click the Edit icon in the column on the right.
  2. In the Effects panel, drag the Vignette slider to the right to add a dark vignette to the edges of the photo. The vignette draws attention to subjects in the center of the photo.
  3. Drag the Vignette slider to the left to create a white vignette for an old-fashioned look.
  4. To fine-tune the shape of a vignette, click the triangle at the top right of the Vignette slider to reveal additional controls, and adjust the Feather, Midpoint, and Roundness sliders.

 

Reduce noise

Reduce digital noise in a photo in Lightroom CC.

 

What you learned: Use the noise reduction controls

Shooting in dark lighting conditions or with your camera set to a high ISO can produce digital noise that looks like specks of grain and is most visible in dark areas of a photo. Use the noise reduction sliders in the Detail panel to reduce digital noise:

  1. With a photo selected, click the Edit icon in the column on the right.
  2. Click 1:1 in the toolbar, or click on the photo, to zoom in to 1:1 view, which is the best way to see and evaluate digital noise.
  3. In the Detail panel, drag the Color Noise Reduction slider to the right to reduce specks of color noise.
  4. Drag the Noise Reduction slider to the right to reduce specks of grayscale noise. If the photo looks too smooth with that adjustment, move the slider back toward the left.
     

Sharpen a photo

Sharpen a photo in Lightroom CC.

 

What you learned: Use the Sharpening controls

Most photos benefit from some sharpening. 

  1. With a photo selected, click the Edit icon in the column on the right.
  2. Click 1:1 in the toolbar, or click on the photo, to zoom in to 1:1 view, which is the best way to evaluate sharpness in a photo.
  3. In the Detail panel, drag the Sharpening slider to the right to control the amount of sharpening. If you’re satisfied with the result, this is often all you need to do.
  4. For more control over sharpening, click the triangle at the top right of the Sharpening slider to reveal additional sharpening sliders.
  5. Set the Radius slider to control the width of the edge halos that create the appearance of sharpness.
  6. Set the Detail slider to control which details in a photo are sharpened. The further you drag to the right, the more details are sharpened.
  7. Hold the Alt key (Windows) or the Option key (MacOS) and drag the Masking slider to view a grayscale mask of the photo. The black areas represent parts of the photo that will be protected from sharpening; the white lines represent edges that will be sharpened. You can use this control to avoid sharpening unwanted details, like grain in a sky.
     
05/11/2018

Photographer: Jillian Lukiwski

Photographer: Pablo Alarcon

Photographer: Adrien Radford

Presenter: Jan Kabili

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