Now that you have imported and organized your photos, you are all set to make some quick edits. Photoshop Elements offers several levels of editing, from quick, basic photo fixes with easy-to-use editing workflows to advanced color correction and composition in the Editor workspace.

In the Organizer workspace, select a photo you want to edit and click the Editor icon  on the taskbar. This will open the photo for editing in the Editor workspace.

Your photo is now open in Photo Editor for editing. You can use the basic photo-fixing tools in Photoshop Elements and perform some common editing tasks quickly, such as fixing the exposure or applying the pencil sketch effect to your photo.

Photo Editor workspace

There are three editing views in Photoshop Elements, which give you different levels of editing capabilities. Start with Quick and Guided. When you have gained some experience, explore the powerful tools in the Expert view.

Quick

Quick view
Quick view

The Quick view lets you quickly perform the most common editing tasks. This view groups basic photo-fixing tools in one place. Use this view to quickly fix the the exposure, color, sharpness, and other aspects of an image. In addition to correcting your photos, you can also transform your photos into professional-looking photos with the help of Effects, Textures, and Frames panel available in this view. For more information, see Photoshop Elements Help.

Guided

Guided view
Guided view

The Guided view provides step-by-step instructions to help you achieve a range of interesting editing results. It provides a wizard-like interface to accomplish certain predefined effects. Each guided edit has an associated image that displays the applied effect when you hover the mouse pointer on it. For more information, see Guided mode.

Expert

Expert view
Expert view

The Expert view lets you edit and enhance your photos using the complete set of powerful tools available in Photoshop Elements. This view provides a flexible and powerful image-correction environment. It has lighting and color-correction commands, along with tools for fixing image defects, making selections, adding text, and painting on your image. For more information, see Photoshop Elements Help.

Fix an overexposed photo

Sometimes, the photos you take turn out to be a little too dark or a little too light. You can fix these overexposed and underexposed photos in a few clicks with Photoshop Elements.

Fix an overexposed photo

Follow these steps to fix an overexposed photo:

  1. Open the photo in Photo Editor.

  2. In the Quick view, make sure Adjustments is selected in the lower-right area of the Action Bar.

    Taskbar in Quick view
  3. Click the Exposure option in the right pane. Photoshop Elements adjusts the exposure and displays nine thumbnails of the photo, each at a different exposure level.

    Exposure
  4. Click the thumbnail of your choice.

  5. Save the photo using any of these options:

    • File > Save: Overwrites the photo you have opened.
    • File > Save As: Saves the fixed photo in a new file. The original photo is untouched.
    • File > Save For Web: Saves the fixed photo in a web-friendly format of your choice. The original photo is untouched.

Apply the Pencil Sketch effect

Follow these steps to apply the Pencil Sketch effect to a photo:

  1. Open the photo in Photo Editor.

  2. In the Quick view, make sure Effects is selected in the lower-right area of the Action Bar.

  3. In the right pane, click Pencil Sketch. Photoshop Elements applies the effect and displays thumbnails of the photo, each with a different pencil sketch effect.

  4. Select a thumbnail in which the Pencil Sketch effect looks good by clicking it.

    Effects in Quick mode
  5. Save the photo using any of these options:

    • File > Save: Overwrites the photo you have opened.
    • File > Save As: Saves the fixed photo in a new file. The original photo is untouched.
    • File > Save For Web: Saves the fixed photo in a web-friendly format of your choice. The original photo is untouched.

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