Working with Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects

  1. Adobe Animate User Guide
  2. Introduction to Animate
    1. What's New in Animate
    2. Visual Glossary
    3. Animate system requirements
    4. Animate keyboard shortcuts
    5. Work with Multiple File Types in Animate
  3. Animation
    1. Animation basics in Animate
    2. How to use frames and keyframes in Animate
    3. Frame-by-frame animation in Animate
    4. How to work with classic tween animation in Animate
    5. Brush Tool
    6. Motion Guide
    7. Motion tween and ActionScript 3.0
    8. About Motion Tween Animation
    9. Motion tween animations
    10. Creating a Motion tween animation
    11. Using property keyframes
    12. Animate position with a tween
    13. How to edit motion tweens using Motion Editor
    14. Editing the motion path of a tween animation
    15. Manipulating motion tweens
    16. Adding custom eases
    17. Creating and applying Motion presets
    18. Setting up animation tween spans
    19. Working with Motion tweens saved as XML files
    20. Motion tweens vs Classic tweens
    21. Shape tweening
    22. Using Bone tool animation in Animate
    23. Work with character rigging in Animate
    24. How to use mask layers in Adobe Animate
    25. How to work with scenes in Animate
  4. Interactivity
    1. How to create buttons with Animate
    2. Convert Animate projects to other document type formats
    3. Create and publish HTML5 Canvas documents in Animate
    4. Add interactivity with code snippets in Animate
    5. Creating custom HTML5 Components
    6. Using Components in HTML5 Canvas
    7. Creating custom Components: Examples
    8. Code Snippets for custom Components
    9. Best practices - Advertising with Animate
    10. Virtual Reality authoring and publishing
  5. Workspace and workflow
    1. Creating and managing Paint brushes
    2. Using Google fonts in HTML5 Canvas documents
    3. Using Creative Cloud Libraries and Adobe Animate
    4. Use the Stage and Tools panel for Animate
    5. Animate workflow and workspace
    6. Using web fonts in HTML5 Canvas documents
    7. Timelines and ActionScript
    8. Working with multiple timelines
    9. Set preferences
    10. Using Animate authoring panels
    11. Create timeline layers with Animate
    12. Export animations for mobile apps and game engines
    13. Moving and copying objects
    14. Templates
    15. Find and Replace in Animate
    16. Undo, redo, and the History panel
    17. Keyboard shortcuts
    18. How to use the timeline in Animate
    19. Creating HTML extensions
    20. Optimization options for Images and Animated GIFs
    21. Export settings for Images and GIFs
    22. Assets Panel in Animate
  6. Multimedia and Video
    1. Transforming and combining graphic objects in Animate
    2. Creating and working with symbol instances in Animate
    3. Image Trace
    4. How to use sound in Adobe Animate
    5. Exporting SVG files
    6. Create video files for use in Animate
    7. How to add a video in Animate
    8. Working with video cue points
    9. Draw and create objects with Animate
    10. Reshape lines and shapes
    11. Strokes, fills, and gradients with Animate CC
    12. Working with Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects
    13. Color Panels in Animate CC
    14. Opening Flash CS6 files with Animate
    15. Work with classic text in Animate
    16. Placing artwork into Animate
    17. Imported bitmaps in Animate
    18. 3D graphics
    19. Working with symbols in Animate
    20. Draw lines & shapes with Adobe Animate
    21. Work with the libraries in Animate
    22. Exporting Sounds
    23. Selecting objects in Animate CC
    24. Working with Illustrator AI files in Animate
    25. Apply patterns with the Spray Brushtool
    26. Applying blend modes
    27. Arranging objects
    28. Automating tasks with the Commands menu
    29. Multilanguage text
    30. Using camera in Animate
    31. Using Animate with Adobe Scout
    32. Working with Fireworks files
    33. Graphic filters
    34. Sound and ActionScript
    35. Drawing preferences
    36. Drawing with the Pen tool
  7. Platforms
    1. Convert Animate projects to other document type formats
    2. Custom Platform Support
    3. Create and publish HTML5 Canvas documents in Animate
    4. Creating and publishing a WebGL document
    5. How to package applications for AIR for iOS
    6. Publishing AIR for Android applications
    7. Publishing for Adobe AIR for desktop
    8. ActionScript publish settings
    9. Best practices - Organizing ActionScript in an application
    10. How to use ActionScript with Animate
    11. Best practices - Accessibility guidelines
    12. Accessibility in the Animate workspace
    13. Writing and managing scripts
    14. Enabling Support for Custom Platforms
    15. Custom Platform Support Overview
    16. Creating accessible content
    17. Working with Custom Platform Support Plug-in
    18. Debugging ActionScript 3.0
    19. Enabling Support for Custom Platforms
  8. Exporting and Publishing
    1. How to export files from Animate CC
    2. OAM publishing
    3. Exporting SVG files
    4. Export graphics and videos with Animate
    5. Publishing AS3 documents
    6. Export animations for mobile apps and game engines
    7. Exporting Sounds
    8. Export QuickTime video files
    9. Controlling external video playback with ActionScript
    10. Best practices - Tips for creating content for mobile devices
    11. Best practices - Video conventions
    12. Best practices - SWF application authoring guidelines
    13. Best practices - Structuring FLA files
    14. Best Practices to optimize FLA files for Animate
    15. ActionScript publish settings
    16. Specify publish settings for Animate
    17. Exporting projector files
    18. Export Images and Animated GIFs
    19. HTML publishing templates
    20. Working with Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects
    21. Quick share and publish your animations

Working with Adobe Premiere Pro and Adobe Animate

Adobe Premiere Pro is a professional tool for editing video. If you use Adobe Animate to design interactive content for websites or mobile devices, you can use Adobe Premiere Pro to edit the movies for those projects. Adobe Premiere Pro gives you professional tools for frame-accurate video editing, including tools for optimizing video files for playback on computer screens and mobile devices.

Adobe Animate is a tool for incorporating video footage into presentations for the web and mobile devices. Adobe Animate offers technological and creative benefits that let you fuse video with data, graphics, sound, and interactive control. The FLV formats let you put video on a web page in a format that almost anyone can view.

If you export video files in other standard formats, Adobe Animate can encode your videos within rich media applications. Adobe Animate uses the latest compression technologies to deliver the greatest quality possible at small file sizes.

Working with Animate and After Effects

If you use Adobe® Animate® to create video or animation, you can use After Effects to edit and refine the video. For example, from Animate you can export animations and applications as QuickTime movies. You can then use After Effects to edit and refine the video.

Animate and After Effects use separate terms for some concepts that they share, including the following:

  • A composition in After Effects is like a movie clip in Animate.

  • The composition frame in the Composition panel is like the Stage in Animate.

  • The Project panel in After Effects is like the Library panel in Animate.

  • Project files in After Effects are like FLA files in Animate.

  • You render and export a movie from After Effects; you publish a SWF file from Animate.

Exporting QuickTime video from Animate

If you create animations or applications with Animate, you can export them as QuickTime movies using the File > Export > Export Movie command in Animate. For an Animate animation, you can optimize the video output for animation. For an Animate application, Animate renders video of the application as it runs, allowing the user to manipulate it. This lets you capture the branches or states of your application that you want to include in the video file.

Importing and publishing video in Animate

When you import an FLV file into Animate, you can use various techniques, such as scripting or Animate components, to control the visual interface that surrounds your video. For example, you may include playback controls or other graphics. You can also add graphic layers on top of the FLV file for composite results.

Composite graphics, animation, and video

Animate and After Effects each include many capabilities that allow you to perform complex compositing of video and graphics. Which application you choose to use will depend on your personal preferences and the type of final output you want to create.

Animate is the more web-oriented of the two applications, with its small final file size. Animate also allows for runtime control of animation. After Effects is oriented toward video and film production, provides a wide range of visual effects, and is used to create video files as final output.

Both applications can be used to create original graphics and animation. Both use a timeline and offer scripting capabilities for controlling animation programmatically. After Effects includes a larger set of effects, while the Animate ActionScript® language is the more robust of the two scripting environments.

Both applications allow you to place graphics on separate layers for compositing. These layers can be turned on and off as needed. Both also allow you to apply effects to the contents of individual layers.

In Animate, composites do not affect the video content directly; they affect only the appearance of the video during playback in Flash Player. In contrast, when you composite with imported video in After Effects, the video file you export actually incorporates the composited graphics and effects.

Because all drawing and painting in After Effects is done on layers separate from any imported video, it is always non-destructive. Animate has both destructive and nondestructive drawing modes.

Importing SWF files into After Effects

Animate has a unique set of vector art tools that make it useful for a variety of drawing tasks not possible in After Effects or Adobe® Illustrator®. You can import SWF files into After Effects to composite them with other video or render them as video with additional creative effects. Interactive content and scripted animation are not retained. Animation defined by keyframes is retained.

Each SWF file imported into After Effects is flattened into a single continuously rasterized layer, with its alpha channel preserved. Continuous rasterization means that graphics stay sharp as they are scaled up. This import method allows you to use the root layer or object of your SWF files as a smoothly rendered element in After Effects, allowing the best capabilities of each tool to work together.

Note:

Advanced Layers mode (Modify > Document…> Mode) is now enabled by default and each layer is published as movie clip in this mode. SWF files that are published with Advanced Layers mode ON and imported into After Effects have the same limitations as that of importing movie clips.

While specifying publish settings for .swf files, you have an option to generate a compatible SWF that can take camera effects, layer depth and parenting to After Effects. Select the Optimize for After Effects option in Publish Settings dialog. Also, this option is enabled by default when FLA is dragged drop into After Effects to preserve the advanced layers feature as it is in After Effects.

Publish Settings
Publish Settings

Importing Animate FLA files into After Effects

Now, you can import Animate FLA files into After Effects to composite them with a video or render them as video with additional creative effects. After Effects can interact with Animate using the plug-in. 

  1. Install Animate 19.0 and After Effects 16.0 from the Creative Cloud application. 

  2. Launch After Effects and create a project.

  3. Go to menu File > Import > File...

  4. Choose sample.fla file and click Import.

    Note:

    Use any AS3 .fla as sample.fla file.

  5. In the Import Preferences dialog, browse to a location where all layer FLA files are generated and click OK.

    By default, it takes the saved FLA file location.

    Import preferences dialog
    Import preferences dialog

    If you choose Import Audio option, the audio on main timeline layers in FLA is exported as .mp3 or .wav sound files. This audio is imported in After Effects as a separate layer.

    All the layers are imported inside a composition in After Effects. Layer order in composition is similar to the order that is used in Animate.

    Note:

    Layer effects and Camera filters are ignored (if used) during import.

Animate and After Effects workflow

In this video, you will learn how to use the enhanced workflow for Animate and After Effects integration.
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