Note:

Adobe will stop the Adobe Story CC service on January 22, 2019. Adobe Story CC, Adobe Story CC (Classic), and Adobe Story CC desktop application will be discontinued. See End of service FAQ for more information.

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

When you add shot information to your original script, it is converted to a shooting script. A shooting script contains information such as shot size, shot numbers, and shot duration.

Note:

The formatting of your original script changes when you add shot information. Best practice is to save a copy of your script before you start adding shot information to the original script.

Shot elements

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

A shot element provides information about the shot size, camera, and the camera movement for the shot.

A shot size defines how much of the subject is seen in the frame.

Shot size/Camera angle

Description

BCU (Big close up)

Extreme close up covering the subject’s face from forehead to chin.

CA (Cut away)

A close up of something other than the current action. It could be a shot of a different subject or a different part of the subject.

Crash In

The camera crashes into the scene containing the subject.

Creep in

The camera ‘creeps in” behind the subject.

CU (Close up)

Unless specified otherwise, it is a close up of the subject’s face.

Cut In

Close up of a part of the subject in detail. For example, a close up of the subject twiddling thumbs.

Dirty Shot

Covers the face of the subject, and the back (head and shoulders) of the person interviewing the subject.

DTL

Provides camera operators with carpeted work area that extends beyond the front of the Dolly.

Dutch angle

The camera is tilted off to the side such that the horizon is at an angle to the bottom of the frame.

Ease In

Gently zoom into the subject.

ECU (Extreme Close Up)

Captures the finer details of the subject without capturing the surroundings. The camera captures only a fraction of the subject in the scene.

Establishing shot

Provides a context for the scene or the subject. For example, an exterior shot of a building at night, followed by an interior shot of people talking. Such a shot implies that the conversation is taking place at night inside that building.

EWS (Extreme Wide Shot)

Establishes the subject’s surroundings. The subject is, most times, barely visible in the shot. The EWS is often used as an establishing shot - the shot used to set the context for the scene.

Extreme Long Shot

Provides a context for the subject in the scene. Similar to the Extreme Wide Shot.

Eye Level

Places the viewer at an equal footing with the subject onscreen.

FS (Full Shot)

Shows in full length the person or object featured in the scene/frame.

High angle

The camera is placed above eye level, looking downward. The shot can make the subject look small or weak.

Long lens shot

Shot using the long lens to zoom into a subject - commonly used in wild life photography.

Long Shot

Places the subject in some relation to the surroundings.

Low angle

The camera is placed below eye level, and looks up at the subject. The shot makes the subject look large, strong, or noble.

MCU

Shows the subject in close up without getting too close. The shot is somewhere between a mid shot and a close up.

Medium Shot

Provides a partial view of the subject, and is sufficient to cover the subject’s expressions and any action around the subject.

Mid Shot

Provides a complete view of the subject along with the action in the scene.

MWS (Medium Wide Shot)

Captures around 75 per cent of the subject’s body.

Noddy shot

Shows the interviewer responding to the guest.

Oblique/Canted

The camera is tilted at an angle to the floor. Such shots usually suggest imbalance, transition and instability. The oblique angle is also used to portray the POV of the subject, that is, it portrays the scene as the subject sees it.

OSS (Over the shoulder shot)

Close up of the subject viewed at shoulder level of another subject in the shot.

Overhead shot

The camera is positioned directly above the subject.

POV (Point of view)

Shows what the subject is looking at (represented through the camera).The camera is placed at the eye position of the character.

Profile shot

A shot of the subject from the side.

Push In

The camera physically moves toward a subject.

Reverse shot

The subject and the other actor in the scene are part of the same scene but not covered by the camera in the same frame. One of the actors is “invisible” to the camera during the conversation.

Slanted

Similar to the Dutch angle. The camera is held at an angle to the subject.

The Bird’s Eye view

Oblique view of the subject from above as though the observer were a bird.

Two Shot

Captures two subjects, not be necessarily next to each other, in the same frame.

VWS (Very Wide Shot)

Defines the environment in which the subject is placed. The shot is much closer to the object than in EWS, but not as near as in the Wide Shot (WS).

Weather Shot

Captures the weather as a subject for the scene.

WS (Wide Shot)

Provides a panoramic view of the action in the scene.

Camera Movement

Description

Aerial

Shot with a crane, or with a camera attached to a special helicopter to view large landscapes.

Arc

Camera movement that combines trucking and panning. The camera zooms out of the subject, simultaneously making a circular move, an arc, while panning all the while keeping the subject in frame.

Crab

A less-common term for tracking or trucking.

Crane

A shot taken by a camera on a crane.

Crash zoom in/Crash zoom out

Effects produced by fast lens movements, like zooms and pull-outs.

Defocus

Camera deviates from accurate focus.

Dolly zoom/Contra zoom/Dolly out

The camera is pulled away from a subject when the lens zooms in, or the other way round. During the zoom, there is a continuous perspective distortion, the most noticeable feature being that the background appears to change size relative to the subject.

Dolly

Camera is mounted on a wheeled platform that is pushed on rails.

Dolly In

As the camera moves toward the subject, more and more of the background disappears "behind" the person in the scene.

Dutch tilt

Achieved by tilting the camera so that the horizon is at an angle to the bottom of the frame. Used to portray the psychological uneasiness or tension in the subject being filmed

Follow

Camera movement technique used to follow the subject.

Focus

Focus camera on one object in a close up shot, causing everything in the background to be out of focus,

Handheld

The photographer holds the video camera, and moves around to capture the action.

JIB

Boom device with a camera on one end, and a counterweight on the other. Properly balanced using the counterweight, the camera can move through an extended arc

Pull Focus

The camera shifts focus alternatively between the person in the foreground and the person in the background.

Pan

Camera moves horizontally across the scene. Establishes a time and space for places or characters in the scene.

Pedestal

Camera moves vertically with respect to the subject.

Steadicam

Stabilizing mount for a motion picture camera allowing for a smooth shot.

Throw focus

Starts the shot focused on a foreground object and then “throws focus” onto the subject.

Tilt

Camera is stationary, but rotates vertically on its axis.

Tracking/Trucking

A tracking shot usually follows the subject as it moves along the screen.

Whip pan

Type of pan shot in which the camera moves sideways so quickly that the picture blurs into indistinct streaks.

Zoom

Produced by a zoom lens, which can vary focal length across a large range.

Insert shot elements in a script

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

Ensure that you have enabled Auto Complete (View > Auto Complete) before you add shot elements in a script. A shot element can be placed anywhere within a scene where you want to provide the camera information.

Shot information is represented in the format Shot size/Camera angle - Camera number - Camera movement.

  1. Press Enter after a paragraph in the scene where you want to insert the Shot element.

  2. Select Shot from the script elements menu.

  3. A message box appears asking if you want to create a copy of your script. Because a shooting script changes the formatting of your original script, it is recommended that you create a copy. A copy of your script is created in the project folder when you click Continue. If you do not want to create a copy of your script, select Continue Without Saving A Copy.

  4. Press Enter. A menu appears listing the available options.

  5. Select an option from the list.

  6. In the menu that appears, select a camera from the list.

  7. In the menu that appears select a camera movement.

    cs_shootingscript
    Shooting script

    A. Scene number B. Shot elements C. Shot number D. Shot duration 

Shot numbers

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

A shot is associated with a scene. The format for a shot number is <scene number>.<shot number>.

Assign shot numbers

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

Adobe Story automatically adds shot numbers to Shot elements in a script. Shot numbers cannot be edited.

View shot numbers

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

  1. Select View> Numbering > Shot.

Scene duration

Adobe Story lets you assign scene or shot durations manually.

Edit shot durations manually

  1. Click the shot duration whose time you want to modify.

  2. Select View > Scene/Shot Duration and then click the duration, which is displayed in editor. Enter the duration, in the format HH:MM:SS, that the shot uses during playback.

    Note:

    Ensure that you select either Running Time or Cum Running Time for shot duration.

View shot duration as running time

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

The running time of a shot is the time calculated adding previous shot durations. For example, if shot one has a duration of 30 seconds (00:00:30), and shot two has a duration of 20 seconds (00:00:20), the running time as indicated in shot two is 50 seconds (00:00:50).

Note:

The shot duration of an omitted scene is ignored when calculating the running shot duration.

  1. Select View > Scene/Shot Duration > Running Time.

View shot duration as cumulative running time

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

Cumulative running time summarizes the duration of the following sequence in a script.

  1. Select View > Scene/Shot Duration > Cum. Running Time.

Hide shot duration display

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

  1. Select View > Scene/Shot Duration > Hide.

Insert shot information in the middle of a scene

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

You can add camera shot information in the middle of a scene. Such information helps studio personnel identify and prepare for changes to camera, camera position, or effect at the specified point in the scene.

cs_shotline
Shot information in the middle of a scene

A. Shot number B. Shot info C. Shot line D. Cut line 

Note:

Adobe Story uses a different template for scripts that contain camera/audio/source information in the middle of a scene. Ensure that you take a backup of your original file before you allow Adobe Story to reformat your document.

  1. Place the cursor at the location where you want to insert the camera information.

  2. Select Production > Camera Shot. If you are using this option for the first time, accept the prompt asking you to take a backup of the original file before proceeding.

  3. In the Camera dialog, select one of the following options according to your requirements.

    Solid Shot Line

    In the script, a cut mark (cut line) appears at the cursor location and extends as a shot line toward the page margin. Shot Information is displayed at the end of the shot line. If you do not want Adobe Story to assign a shot number, deselect Shot Number. Enter information for visual effects (Vision FX), camera number (Camera), camera position/location (Position), and description of the shot in the respective options.

    Dashed Shot Line

    Similar to solid shot line except that the style of the line is in the form of continuous dash strokes. It can be used at locations in your script where you want to include onscreen graphics.

    Shot Development

    Use this option when you want to change the camera and shot information in the middle of a dialogue. The options for effects and camera position are disabled when you choose this option. For example, you want the camera to zoom out of the object when the dialogue is being spoken. Enter the camera number and a description of the shot in the respective options.

    Camera Reposition

    Use this option when you want to change the camera position in the middle of a shot. Enter the camera number and description after you select the option.

Edit Camera Shot information

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

  1. Double-click the camera shot information in the script.

  2. In the dialog that appears, edit the information.

Add videotape elements in the middle of a scene

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

Place videotape (VT) elements at a position in the scene where the source of the content is a videotape.

Add videotape (VT) element with shot number and duration details

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

  1. Place your cursor at the position where you want to add the videotape element.

  2. Select Production > Video Tape.

  3. In the Video Tape Instructions dialog, select Shot Line.

  4. The Shot Number is added by default. If you do not want to add shot number, deselect the option. For example, deselect this option for shots within shots where there is no change in the source from the current shot.

  5. When you select Duration Details, the following options appear in the script. Enter relevant information for the respective options.

    In

    Information (dialogue) that introduces the VT shot.

    Out

    Information (dialogue) that indicates the end of the VT shot.

    Duration

    The duration of the VT shot. There is no specified format. You can enter duration in the format that you desire.

Add Standby VT information

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

Use this option to provide information on videotape in the standby mode.

  1. Place your cursor at the position where you want to add the videotape element.

  2. Select Production > Video Tape.

  3. In the Video Tape Instructions dialog, select Stand By VT.

You can choose to accept the default options, or add information in the Ident option. In Ident, add videotapes you want to use in the standby mode. For multiple videotapes, use the separators;, +, or &. For example, to indicate videotapes 1 and 4, enter 1+4, 1;4, or 1&4.

Add Run VT information

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

Use this option to provide information on videotape that must be played.

  1. Place your cursor at the position where you want to add the videotape element.

  2. Select Production > Video Tape.

  3. In the videotape Instructions dialog, select Run VT.

You can choose to accept the default options, or add information in the Ident option. In Ident, add videotapes that must be played. For multiple videotapes, use the separators;, +, or &. For example, to indicate videotapes 1 and 4, enter 1+4, 1;4, or 1&4.

Edit videotape (VT) information

Available for: Adobe Story Plus

  1. Double-click the VT information in the script.

  2. In the dialog that appears, edit the information.

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