Use Edit controls in Lightroom CC

You can access the Edit controls in Detail view. In the Edit panel, the edit controls are organized under various panels that you can expand/collapse to access those controls─Light, Color, Effects, Detail, Optics, and Geometry. To help you visually understand the effect that each of these edit controls produce in your photo, this article provides accompanying animations and visuals to illustrate the concepts.  

To begin editing a photo using any of the Edit controls, do the following:    

  1. Click () icon on the left to bring up My Photos panel.

    In My Photos panel, choose the album that contains the photo that you want to edit. 

  2. If you're in Photo Grid () view or Square Grid () view, select the photo that you want to edit. Now, click () icon in the toolbar at the bottom to switch to Detail view. 

    If you're already in Detail () view, select the photo that you want to edit from the filmstrip appearing at the bottom of your current selection.

    Note:

    The Edit controls are only available in Detail view.

  3. To bring up the Edit panel in Detail view, click () icon at the upper-right corner. 

    You can now expand/collapse the panels to access edit controls organized under─Light, Color, Effects, Detail, Optics, and Geometry. These edit controls are explained in detail below. 

Light

Adjust the tonal range of your image.

Using the slider controls provided in the Light panel, you can adjust the overall tonal range of your image. To automatically adjust these settings, click AUTO.  

Exposure
Contrast
Highlights

Exposure:

Controls the brightness of your photo. Move the slider to the left to make the image darker; move it to the right to make the image brighter.

Contrast:

Determines the contrast between light and dark colors. Move the slider to the left to flatten the contrast; move it to the right to make the contrast more dramatic. 

Highlights:

Controls the brightness of the lighter parts of your photo. Move the slider to the left to darken highlights to recover details; move it to the right to brighten them and reduce details. 

  

Shadows
Whites
Blacks

Shadows:

Controls the brightness of the lighter parts of your photo. Move the slider to the left to deepen shadows; move it to the right to brighten them and recover details.

Whites:

Sets the white point of the image. Move the slider to the right to make more colors appear completely white.

Blacks:

Sets the black point of the image. Move the slider to the left to make more colors appear completely black.

Color

Fine-tune color in your image.

Using the slider controls in the Color panel, you can adjust colors in your image. 

  • Set White Balance by choosing a preset option or specifying a neutral area in the photo with the  White Balance Selector.
  • Fine-tune the white balance using the Temp and Tint controls.
  • Adjust the color saturation (vividness) using the Vibrance and Saturation controls.
  • Convert the photo to Black & White using the   B&W button.
  • Fine-tune individual colors using the   Hue, Saturation, and Luminance (HSL) sliders.
Temp
Tint Vibrance
Saturation

Temp:

Determines how cool or warm the colors appear in your photo. Move the slider to the left if colors are too yellow; move it to the right if colors are too blue.

Tint:

Determines how green or purple the colors appear in your photo. Move the slider to the left if colors are too purple; move it to the right if colors are too green.

Vibrance:

Increases the saturation of lower-saturated colors more than higher-saturated colors, which can help prevent skin-tones from looking unnatural.

Saturation:

Boosts the saturation of all colors equally. Move the slider to the left to de-saturate colors, move it to the right to boost saturation.

Effects

Apply effects to your image - Clarity, Dehaze, and Vignette.

Clarity
Dehaze
Vignette

Clarity:

Changes the contrast around the edges of objects in your photo. Move the slider to the left to soften portraits; move it to the right to make landscapes more clear.

Dehaze:

Move the slider to the left to add simulated haze; move it to the right to remove haze.

Vignette:

Makes the outer edges of the photo lighter or darker. Adjust the Vignette sliders:

  • Feather: Lower values reduce softening between the vignette and the vignette’s surrounding pixels. Higher values increase the softening.
  • Midpoint: Lower values apply the Amount adjustment to a larger area away from the corners. Higher values restrict the adjustment to an area closer to the corners.
  • Roundness: Lower values make the vignette effect more oval. Higher values make the vignette effect more circular.
  • Highlights: Controls the degree of highlight contrast preserved when Amount is negative. Suitable for photos with small highlights, such as candles and lamps.

Detail

Sharpen, reduce image noise, and apply film grain effects

Using the slider controls provided under the Detail panel, you can sharpen your photo to enhance edge definition and bring out detail, as well as remove image noise that can degrade image quality. Image noise includes luminance (grayscale) noise, which makes an image look grainy, and chroma (color) noise, which is usually visible as colored artifacts in the image. Photos taken with high ISO speeds can have noticeable noise.

Sharpening
Noise Reduction Color Noise Reduction
Grain

Sharpening:

Move the slider to the right to sharpen details.

  • Radius: Adjusts the size of the details that sharpening is applied to. Photos with very fine details may need a lower radius setting. Photos with larger details may be able to use a larger radius. Using too large a radius generally results in unnatural-looking results.
  • Detail: Adjusts how much high-frequency information is sharpened in the image and how much the sharpening process emphasizes edges. Lower settings primarily sharpen edges to remove blurring. Higher values are useful for making the textures in the image more pronounced.
  • Masking: Controls an edge mask. With a setting of zero (0), everything in the image receives the same amount of sharpening. With a setting of 100, sharpening is mostly restricted to those areas near the strongest edges.

Noise Reduction:

Move the slider to the right to reduce luminance noise.

  • Detail: Controls the luminance noise threshold. Useful for very noisy photos. Higher values preserve more detail but may produce noisier results. Lower values produce cleaner results but may also remove some detail.
  • Contrast: Controls luminance contrast. Useful for very noisy photos. Higher values preserve contrast but may produce noisy blotches or mottling. Lower values produce smoother results but may also have less contrast.

Color Noise Reduction:

Move the slider to the right to reduce color noise.

  • Detail: Controls the color noise threshold. Higher values protect thin, detailed color edges but may result in color speckling. Lower values remove color speckles but may result in color bleeding.
  • Smoothness: Higher values apply a softened effect to the speckled color tones.

Grain:

Move the slider to the right to add film grain.

  • Size: Controls grain particle size. At sizes of 25 or greater, blue is added to make the effect look better with noise reduction.
  • Roughness: Controls the regularity of the grain. Move left to make the grain more uniform; move to the right to make the grain more uneven.

Optics

Correct common camera lens issues

Camera lenses can exhibit different types of defects at certain focal lengths, f-stops, and focus distances. You can correct and/or minimize these issues using the options provided in the Optics panel.

Correct chromatic aberration

Chromatic aberration appears as a color fringe along the edges of objects. It is caused by the failure of the lens to focus different colors to the same spot, aberrations in sensor microlenses, and by flare.

Chromatic Aberration:

Select the check box to automatically correct blue-yellow and red-green fringes in your image.  

Optics panel
Optics panel
Fixing chromatic aberration
(Left) Original photo, (upper-right) zoomed area of the photo with blue/yellow fringing, and (lower right) after fixing chromatic aberration.

Enable lens corrections

Lightroom CC includes numerous lens profiles, which can be used to correct common lens aberrations such as geometric distortion and vignetting. The profiles are based on metadata that identifies the camera and lens used to capture the photo, and then compensates accordingly.

  1. In the Optics panel, select the Enable Lens Corrections check box.

    Enable Lens Correction
    Enable Lens Correction

    Lightroom CC automatically selects a matching lens profile based on the camera model, focal length, f-stop and focus distance information in your photo's metadata.

    Cameras with built-in lens profile support

    Lens correction for all Micro 4/3 (MFT) lenses and cameras, including Panasonic, Olympus, and other cameras (Fuji X, Leica Q, plus many point-and-shoot models from Canon) happens automatically without your interaction.

    If your lens is supported automatically, Lightroom CC displays the message 'Built-in Lens Profile Applied' in the Optics panel (see the image below).

    Built-in Lens Profile applied
    Built-in Lens Profile applied. Click the info icon to view Lens Profile information.
  2. (Optional) If Lightroom CC is unable to find a matching lens profile automatically or if you want to change the automatic selection, do the following:

    1. Click the current lens profile to change the automatic selection or click Manually Select a Profile if Lightroom CC couldn't find a lens profile automatically.
    2. In the Select a Lens Profile dialog box, select a Make, Model, and Profile.

    The lense profiles that are available depend on whether you’re adjusting a raw or a non-raw file. For a list of supported lenses, see Supported lenses.

    Manually select a lens profile
    Manually select a profile
    Select a Lens Profile dialog
    Select a Lens Profile dialog

  3. If desired, customize the correction applied by the profile by using the following sliders:

    Distortion Correction:

    The default value 100 applies 100% of the distortion correction in the profile. Values over 100 apply greater correction to the distortion; values under 100 apply less correction to the distortion.

    Lens Vignetting:

    The default value 100 applies 100% of the vignetting correction in the profile. Values over 100 apply greater correction to vignetting; values under 100 apply less correction to vignetting.

Geometry

Adjust geometric perspective in your photos

A close distance to the subject, as well as certain types of lenses, can distort perspective and make straight lines appear bowed, tilted or skewed in your photos. You can correct for these issues using the controls in the Geometry panel.

Upright modes in the Geometry panel.
Upright modes in the Geometry panel.

The Upright control provides four automatic perspective correction options - Auto, Level, Vertical, and Full, as well as a manual Guided option. After applying Upright, you can refine the adjustment using the Manual Transform sliders.

Choose an Upright mode to correct perspective

  1. Choose a photo to correct.

    Original photo with distorted geometry.
    Original photo with distorted geometry.

  2. (Recommended) In the Detail view, open the Edit control and navigate to the Optics panel. Select the Enable Lens Corrections check box.

    Note:

    Enabling lens corrections is highly recommended, before processing the photo with the Upright modes.

  3. Navigate to the Geometry panel. From Upright menu, choose an option to apply the correction to the photo.

    Guided:

    Allows you to draw up to four guides on your photo to customize perspective correction.

    Auto:

    Corrects both vertical and horizontal perspective while balancing the overall image, preserving as much of the visible image area as possible.

    Level:

    Corrects horizontal perspective.

    Vertical:

    Corrects horizontal perspective.

    Full:

    Combines all Upright correction types to automatically correct perspective.

     

    Using Guided Upright Tool

    If you chose the Upright mode as Guided, do the following:

    1. Click the Guided Upright Tool icon and then draw the guides directly on your photo.

    Guided Upright Tool
    Guided Upright Tool

    2. Once you have drawn at least two guides, the photo transforms interactively.

    Three guides drawn over the photo using Guided Upright Tool
    Three guides drawn over the photo using Guided Upright Tool.
  4. Cycle through the Upright modes until you find the most preferable setting.

    All the Upright modes correct and manage distortion and perspective errors. The best setting varies from one photo to another. Experiment with the modes before deciding on the best possible mode for your photo.

  5. (Optional) When correcting the perspective of a photo, you may get white areas near the image boundaries. To prevent this, select the Constrain Crop option to automatically crop the photo according to the original dimension.

  6. Use Manual Transforms to fine-tune the perspective corrections - Distortion, Vertical, Horizontal, Rotate, Aspect, Scale, X Offset, Y Offset.

    Original photo with distorted geometry.
    Original photo with distorted geometry.
    Image with perspective correction.
    Image with corrected perspective.
    Manual Transforms
    Manual Transforms

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