After you create the object, you can invoke attributes and operations on the object using the syntax described in Creating and using objects.

CORBA works with JDK 1.8.

Using CORBA interface methods in ColdFusion

When you use the cfobject tag or the CreateObject function to create a CORBA object, ColdFusion creates a handle to a CORBA interface: the cfobject name attribute or the CreateObject function return variable. For example, the following CFML creates a handle named myHandle:

class = "d:\temp\tester.ior" name = "myHandle" locale="visibroker">
<cfset myHandle = CreateObject("CORBA", "d:\temp\tester.ior", "IOR", "visibroker")

You use the handle name to invoke all of the interface methods, as in the following CFML:

<cfset ret=myHandle.method(foo)>

Method name case considerations

Method names in IDL are case sensitive. However, ColdFusion is not case sensitive. Therefore, do not use methods that differ only in case in IDL.
For example, the following IDL method declarations correspond to two different methods:

testCall(in string a); // method #1
TestCall(in string a); // method #2

However, ColdFusion cannot differentiate between the two methods. If you call either method, you cannot be sure which of the two gets invoked.

Passing parameters by value (in parameters)

CORBA in parameters are always passed by value. When calling a CORBA method with a variable in ColdFusion, specify the variable name without quotation marks, as shown in the following example:

IDL

void method(in string a);

CFML

<cfset foo="my string"><cfset ret=handle.method(foo)>

Passing variables by reference (out and inout parameters)

CORBA out and inout parameters are always passed by reference. As a result, if the CORBA object modifies the value of the variable that you pass when you invoke the method, your ColdFusion page gets the modified value.
To pass a parameter by reference in ColdFusion, specify the variable name in double-quotation marks in the CORBA method. The following example shows an IDL line that defines a method with a string variable, b, that is passed in and out of the method by reference. It also shows CFML that calls this method.

IDL

void method(in string a, inout string b);

CFML

<cfset foo = "My Initial String"><cfset ret=handle.method(bar, "foo")><cfoutput>#foo#</cfoutput>

In this case, the ColdFusion variable foo corresponds to the inout parameter b. When the CFML executes, the following happens:

  1. ColdFusion calls the method, passing it the variable by reference.
  2. The CORBA method replaces the value passed in, "My Initial String", with some other value. Because the variable was passed by reference, this action modifies the value of the ColdFusion variable.
  3. The cfoutput tag prints the new value of the foo variable.
Using methods with return values

Use CORBA methods that return values as you would any ColdFusion function; for example:

IDL

double method(out double a);

CFML

<cfset foo=3.1415><cfset ret=handle.method("foo")><cfoutput>#ret#</cfoutput>

Using IDL types with ColdFusion variables

ColdFusion supports specific CORBA data types and converts between CORBA types and ColdFusion data.

IDL support

The following table shows which CORBA IDL types ColdFusion supports, and whether they can be used as parameters or return variables. (NA means not applicable.)

CORBA IDL type

General support

As parameters

As return value

constants

No

No

No

attributes

Yes (for properties)

NA

NA

enum

Yes (as an integer)

Yes

Yes

union

No

No

No

sequence

Yes

Yes

Yes

array

Yes

Yes

Yes

interface

Yes

Yes

Yes

typedef

Yes

NA

NA

struct

Yes

Yes

Yes

module

Yes

NA

NA

exception

Yes

NA

NA

any

No

No

No

boolean

Yes

Yes

Yes

char

Yes

Yes

Yes

wchar

Yes

Yes

Yes

string

Yes

Yes

Yes

wstring

Yes

Yes

Yes

octet

Yes

Yes

Yes

short

Yes

Yes

Yes

long

Yes

Yes

Yes

float

Yes

Yes

Yes

double

Yes

Yes

Yes

unsigned short

Yes

Yes

Yes

unsigned long

Yes

Yes

Yes

longlong

No

No

No

unsigned longlong

No

No

No

void

Yes

NA

Yes

Data type conversion

The following table lists IDL data types and the corresponding ColdFusion data types:

IDL type

ColdFusion type

boolean

Boolean

char

One-character string

wchar

One-character string

string

String

wstring

String

octet

One-character string

short

Integer

long

Integer

float

Real number

double

Real number

unsigned short

Integer

unsigned long

Integer

void

Not applicable (returned as an empty string)

struct

Structure

enum

Integer, where 0 corresponds to the first enumerator in the enum type

array

Array (must match the array size specified in the IDL)

sequence

Array

interface

An object reference

module

Not supported (cannot dereference by module name)

exception

ColdFusion throws an exception of type coldfusion.runtime.corba.CorbaUserException

attribute

Object reference using dot notation

Boolean data considerations

ColdFusion treats any of the following as Boolean values:

True

"yes", "true", or 1

False

"no", "false", or 0

You can use any of these values with CORBA methods that take Boolean parameters, as the following code shows:

IDL

 

{
interface TManager
{
void testBoolean(in boolean a);
void testOutBoolean(out boolean a);
void testInoutBoolean(inout boolean a);
boolean returnBoolean();
}
}

 

CFML

 

<cfset ret = handle.testboolean("yes")>
<cfset mybool = True>
<cfset ret = handle.testoutboolean("mybool")>
<cfoutput>#mybool#</cfoutput>
<cfset mybool = 0>
<cfset ret = handle.testinoutboolean("mybool")>
<cfoutput>#mybool#</cfoutput>
<cfset ret = handle.returnboolean()>
<cfoutput>#ret#</cfoutput>

 

Struct data type considerations

For IDL struct types, use ColdFusion structures. You can prevent errors by using the same case for structure key names in ColdFusion as you do for the corresponding IDL struct field names.

Enum type considerations

ColdFusion treats the enum IDL type as an integer with the index starting at 0. As a result, the first enumerator corresponds to 0, the second to 1, and so on. In the following example, the IDL enumerator a corresponds to 0, b to 1 and c to 2:

IDL

 

{
enum EnumType {a, b, c};
interface TManager
{
void testEnum(in EnumType a);
void testOutEnum(out EnumType a);
void testInoutEnum(inout EnumType a);
EnumType returnEnum();
}
}

 

CFML

 

<cfset ret = handle.testEnum(1)>

 

In this example, the CORBA object gets called with the second (not first) entry in the enumerator.

Double-byte character considerations

If you are using an ORB that supports CORBA later than version 2.0, you do not have to do anything to support double-byte characters. Strings and characters in ColdFusion convert appropriately to wstring and wchar data when they are used. However, the CORBA 2.0 IDL specification does not support the wchar and wstring types, and uses the 8-bit Latin-1 character set to represent string data. In this case, you cannot pass parameters containing those characters, however, you can call parameters with char and string types using ColdFusion string data.

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