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How to identify and troubleshoot issues with plug-ins in Photoshop.
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    You may experience an issue a Photoshop plug-ins for any of these reasons:

    • The plug-in was designed for a different version of Photoshop and is not compatible with your current version.
    • The plug-in was installed incompletely or incorrectly.
    • More than one version of the same plug-in is installed.
    • A plug-in file has become damaged.

    Here are some good general guidelines to follow with third-party plug-ins to quickly troubleshoot problems:

    Do:

    • Check the plug-in manufacturer’s website for the latest version of your plug-in. Downloading an updated version will often fix plug-in issues.
    • Use the manufacturer’s plug-in installer to install (or re-install) their plug-ins.

    Don’t:

    • Manually drag plug-ins from a previous version of Photoshop’s plug-ins folder to your current version’s Photoshop Plug-Ins folder.
    • Point the Photoshop Additional Plug-ins Folder option (Preferences > Plug-Ins) at a previous version of Photoshop’s Plug-Ins folder. (This preference no longer exists beginning in Photoshop CC [2014 release].)
    Tip:

    Always go to the third-party developer’s website and download the installer for the latest compatible plug-in version. Third-party plug-ins using their own installation mechanism aren’t automatically moved or synchronized between major Photoshop versions (such as Photoshop CC to Photoshop CC [2014 release]). Often, third-party plug-ins put required files for DRM (activation) in directories outside the plug-in folders. For this reason, just moving the plug-ins between versions can sometimes cause errors and performance issues.

    Note:

    If you have a 64-bit version of Windows 7 or Windows 8 and require a 32-bit version of Photoshop for compatibility with legacy plug-ins or device drivers, you can download the 32-bit version of Photoshop.


    Use these steps to identify and remove a problematic plug-in.

    Identify the problematic plug-in

    To quickly determine whether Photoshop is loading a problematic optional or third-party plug-in, do the following:

    1. Close Photoshop.

    2. Hold down the Shift key and launch Photoshop. A dialog appears during launch that reads “Skip loading optional and third-party plug-ins?”

      Skip loading dialog box
    3. Click Yes to skip loading optional and third-party plug-ins.

      Note:

      This disables optional and third-party plug-ins only for the current session. If you quit and restart Photoshop without holding down the Shift key, the optional or third-party plug-ins will be enabled.

    4. Try to re-create the problem.

    If the problem recurs, an installed optional or third-party plug-in is not causing the problem. Close Photoshop and then restart it without holding the Shift key to re-enable all the optional and third-party plug-ins. Skip the remaining steps in this section.

    If the problem does not recur, an optional or third-party plug-in is causing the problem. To identify specific problematic plug-ins:

    1. Close Photoshop.

    2. Move one plug-in from Photoshop’s Plug-ins folder to a temporary location (for example, a new folder on your desktop).

      Note:

      See Locate plug-in folders for the locations of the Photoshop plug-in folders.

    3. Start Photoshop and then try to re-create the problem.

    4. Do one of the following:

      • If the problem recurs, repeat steps 1 through 3.
      • If the problem does not recur, the plug-in that you last removed is causing the problem. Remove or disable this plug-in permanently and then contact its publisher for support or for information about an updated plug-in version. Reinstall or re-enable the non-problematic optional and third-party plug-ins that you removed or disabled.
    5. Start Photoshop and then try to re-create the problem.

    Permanently disable the problematic plug-in

    To permanently disable a plug-in, use one or more of these methods:

    • Remove the plug-in from Photoshop’s Plug-ins folder to a temporary location that is outside of Photoshop’s Plug-ins folders (for example, to a new folder on your desktop).
    • Rename each of the problematic plug-in files so that the filename begins with a tilde (~). Photoshop does not load files that begin with a tilde.
    • Follow the uninstall/removal instructions provided by each plug-in’s publisher.

    Note:

    This preference no longer exists beginning with Photoshop CC (2014 release). Use this troubleshooting section for issues occurring in Photoshop CC and CS6.

    Plug-ins preferences

    Determine whether Photoshop is loading a problematic plug-in from the Additional Plug-Ins folder:

    1. In Photoshop, choose Edit > Preferences > Plug-Ins (Windows) or Photoshop > Preferences > Plug-Ins (Mac OS).

    2. In the Preferences dialog, deselect the Additional Plug-Ins Folder option.

    3. Click OK.

    4. Restart Photoshop for the change to take effect.

    5. Try to re-create the problem.

    If the problem recurs, a plug-in in the Additional Plug-Ins folder is not the cause. Re-enable the Additional Plug-Ins Folder option.

    If the problem does not recur, a plug-in in the Additional
    Plug-Ins folder is the cause. To identify the problematic plug-in, do the
    following:

    1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Plug-Ins (Windows) or Photoshop > Preferences > Plug-Ins (Mac OS).

    2. In the Preferences dialog, select the Additional Plug-Ins Folder option. Note the location of this folder.

    3. Click OK.

    4. Close Photoshop.

    5. Navigate to the location of the Additional Plug-Ins folder.

    6. Move one plug-in from the Additional Plug-Ins folder to a temporary location (for example, a new folder on your desktop).

    7. Start Photoshop and then try to re-create the problem.

    8. Do one of the following:

      • If the problem recurs, repeat Steps 4 through 7.
      • If the problem does not recur, the plug-in that you last moved out of the Additional Plug-Ins folder is the cause. Leave this plug-in out of your Additional Plug-Ins folder and then contact its publisher for support or for information about an updated plug-in version. Restore all the non-problematic optional and third-party plug-ins that you previously moved out of the Additional Plug-Ins folder.

    You can install third-party plug-ins in one or more of the following locations:

    • The Photoshop Plug-Ins folder, or to a subfolder within the Photoshop Plug-Ins folder. (Most third-party plug-ins are installed in this location.)
    • In a custom location and then load them into Photoshop by enabling the Additional Plug-Ins Folder option in the preferences.

    Windows

    If you installed Photoshop to the default location, the Photoshop Plug-Ins folder is located here:

    • Hard Drive/Program Files/Adobe/[Photoshop version]/Plug-ins
    Plug-ins folder Windows

    Additionally, the Camera Raw plug-in is located in a common plug-ins folder, which Photoshop, Bridge, and Photoshop Elements share:

    • Hard Drive/Program Files/Common Files/Adobe/Plug-Ins/[Photoshop version number]

    Mac OS X

    If you installed Photoshop to the default location, the Photoshop Plug-Ins folder is located here:

    • Hard Drive/Applications/[Photoshop version]/Plug-ins
    Plug-ins folder MacOS

    Additionally, the Camera Raw plug-in is located in a common plug-ins folder, which Photoshop, Bridge, and Photoshop Elements share:

    • Hard Drive/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Plug-Ins/[Photoshop version number]/File Formats.
    Note:

    Photoshop is a 64-bit only application. 32-bit plug-ins are no longer supported in Photoshop. Contact the plug-in vendor to obtain an update for 64-bit support of the plug-in. Or, keep your previous version of Photoshop installed to run legacy 32-bit plug-ins.


     
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