Learn about effects, video, audio, and publish settings available in the Export Settings dialog for Adobe Media Encoder.

Export Settings dialog box overview

To open the Export Settings dialog, select Export Settings from the context menu of the asset, or select Edit > Export Settings.

 

Export Settings
Export Settings

The Export Settings dialog includes a large viewing area on the left, which includes Source and Output panels.

Other tabs in the Export Settings dialog box include available effects, video and audio encoding, closed captions, and Publish settings for the selected format.

For information about using the various encoding options in the Export Settings dialog box, see Encoding and exporting.

For information about using the controls in the timeline area and the image viewing area to crop and trim the source item, see Crop and trim source before encoding.

Image viewing area

  • To toggle between previewing an image with or without pixel aspect ratio correction, click the Aspect Ratio Correction toggle button to the right of the Zoom menu.
  • To zoom into and out of the preview image, choose zoom level from the Select Zoom Level menu above the timeline.

Note:

You can also zoom out by pressing Ctrl+- (hyphen) (Windows), or Command+- (hyphen) (Mac OS). Zoom in by pressing Ctrl+= (equal sign) (Windows) or Command+= (equal sign) (Mac OS). These keyboard shortcuts use the main keyboard, not the keys on the numeric keypad.

Timeline and time display

A time display and a timeline are located under the image viewing area in both the Source panel and Output panel. The timeline includes a current-time indicator, a viewing area bar, and buttons for setting In and Out points.

To move the current-time indicator, click or drag the current-time display or drag the current-time indicator. You can also type the timecode directly in the current time display to move the CTI to the specific frame.

Render Alpha Channel only

This option can be used for sources that contain an alpha channel. When this option is enabled, only the alpha channel gets rendered in the output video.  A grayscale preview of the alpha channel gets shown in the Output tab.  This setting is useful when exporting to formats like MXF that don't support transparency info.  You can use the alpha channel-only output to define transparent areas of your video in third-party applications.

Crop and trim source before encoding

You can trim source video and audio so that only a portion of the entire duration is exported.

  1. In the Export Settings dialog box, click either the Source tab or the Output tab.

  2. To trim the video, set an In point (first frame) and Out point (last frame). You can set the In point or Out point to the current time by clicking the Set In Point or Set Out Point button above the timeline, or by dragging the In point or Out point icon in the timeline. You can also use the I key to set an In point and the O key to set an Out point.

    The Source Range menu can contain the following choices:

    • Work Area - Trims to the work area specified in Premiere Pro and After Effects projects
    • In/Out - Trims to the In and Out marks set on clips or sequences from Premiere Pro and After Effects
    • Entire Clip/Sequence - Uses the entire duration of the clip or sequence
    • Custom - Trims to the In and Out marks set in the Export Settings dialog.

    Note:

    Adobe Media Encoder honors timecode information in a source file. If the source starts from 00:00:05:00, then the timeline for the item in Adobe Media Encoder also starts from 00:00:05:00, and not from zero. This timecode information is included in the encoded output file.

  3. To crop the video frame, click the Crop button in the upper-left corner of the Source panel.

  4. Do any of the following:
    • Drag the sides or corner handles of the crop box.
    • Enter values for Left, Top, Right, Bottom, in pixels.
  5. To constrain the proportions of the cropped video frame, choose an option from the Crop Proportions menu.

  6. Click the Output tab to preview the cropped video frame.

  7. From the Source Scaling menu on the Output panel, select how the source video frame should fit within the exported video frame. For more information on the different scaling options, see Scaling source frames.

Note:

To revert to an uncropped image, click the Crop button again.

Scaling source frames

Use the options in the Source Scaling menu of the Export Settings dialog for better scaling of source frames within output frames of a different size. This setting is available for any output format with editable frame dimensions.

Source Scaling options
Source Scaling options

Scale To Fit

Scales the source frame to fit within the output frame while maintaining pixel aspect ratio of the source. Source frames are letter-boxed or pillar-boxed within the output frame as necessary.

If you have cropped the video, the dimensions of the cropped video are adjusted to fit within the Frame Width and Frame Height specified in the Video tab. If the aspect ratio defined by those values do not match that of the cropped video, then you have black bars on encoded footage.

Scale To Fill

Scales the source frame to completely fill the output frame while cropping the source frame as necessary. Pixel aspect ratio of the source frame is maintained.

Stretch To Fill

Resizes the source frame to completely fill the output frame. Pixel aspect ratio of the source is not maintained, hence distortions may occur if the output frame does not have the same aspect as the source.

Scale To Fit With Black Borders

Source frame, including the cropped area, is fit within the output frame. Pixel aspect ratio is maintained. A black border is applied to the video, even if the target dimension is smaller than the source video.

Change Output Size To Match Source

Automatically sets the height and width of the output video frame to the height and width of the source video frame, overriding the output frame size settings.

Select this setting if you want the output frame size to match the source frame size exactly.

Note:

Change Output Size to Match Source is not available with all export formats.  You can achieve the same result by clicking the Match Source button in the video tab or by choosing a Match Source preset.

Effects settings

Lumetri Effect

Use the Lumetri effect to apply various color grades to your video sequence. 

You can choose a Lumetri preset from the popup menu, or you also apply custom Looks and LUTs created in Adobe SpeedGrade or other color grading application. Choose the Select... Option from the Applied drop-down list to apply a custom Look or LUT file.

SDR Conform

Use SDR Conform to convert your HDR video to SDR for playback on non-HDR devices. Set the following values in percentage:

  • Brightness
  • Contrast
  • Soft Knee (controls the transition to full compression mode)

Image Overlay

Use Image Overlay to overlay an image on your sequence. The following options are available:

  • Applied - Browse and choose the image to overlay
  • Position - Sets the relative position of the image overlay within the output frame. For example, Center, upper left, lower right.
  • Offset - Specifies the the horizontal and vertical offset from the relative position (in pixels) for the image overlay.
  • Size - Adjusts the size of the image. By default, the image overlay's size auto‐adjusts to the current output frame size. This means that the image gets overlaid according to its relative size regardless of the output resolution. When Absolute Sizing is enabled, the image overlay's size is linked to the native size of the source image. When Absolute Sizing option is checked, the image overlay appears smaller at higher output resolutions and larger at lower output resolutions.
  • Opacity - Specifies the opacity of the image

Name Overlay

Overlays text onto the output video. The following options are available with this effect:

  • Prefix - Text added to the beginning of the filename. 
  • Suffix - Text added to the end of the filename. 
  • Format - Specifies the options the name is displayed with. The following options are available:
    • Prefix and Suffix Only
    • Source filename
    • Source filename (without extension)
    • Output filename
    • Output filename (without extension)
  • Position - Sets the relative position of the text within the output frame. For example, Center, upper-left, and Top Center.
  • Offset - Specifies the horizontal and vertical offsets (in pixels) for the name
  • Size - Adjusts the size of the name
  • Opacity - Specifies the opacity of the black background behind the text

Timecode Overlay

Overlays a timecode on your video output. The following options are available for the Timecode Overlay effect:

  • Position - Sets the relative position of the timecode within the output frame. For example,  Center, upper-left, Top Center
  • Offset - Lets you adjust the horizontal and vertical offsets (in pixels) of the timecode within the output frame
  • Size - Adjusts the size of the timecode
  • Time Source - Specifies how timecode is generated
    • Media File - Reads Timecode from the source media. If the source media is not detected, timecode overlay starts at zero and matches the source's frame rate.
      • Offset in Frames - Specifies the number of frames by which the source timecode should be offset. You can give either positive or negative values for this offset.  
    • Generate Timecode - Lets you specify custom timecode to overlay over the video. When this option is selected, choose a frame rate and counting method from the Format drop-down list. You can also specify a custom starting Timecode.

Time Tuner

Time Tuner allows you to extend or reduce of the output file by duplicating or removing frames at specific times so that the overall change in duration is unnoticeable. The following options are available within the Time Tuner Effect:

  • Current Duration - Duration of the original source file. 
  • Target Duration - New duration of the output file after effect is applied.
  • Duration Change - Percentage by which the output duration differs from the source duration. You can set this from -10% (shorter duration) to +10% (longer duration).
  • In Preset Use - Select the option you want Time Tuner to use when using the Time Tuner preset. The following options are available:
    • Target Duration - Adjusts the output to a specific target duration, regardless of the source's original duration.
    • Duration Change - Adjusts the output duration to a percentage of the source's original duration.

Video Limiter

Video Limiter constrains the luminance and color values of source files so that they fall within safe broadcasting limits.

  • Reduction Axis -  Sets the limits defining the range of luminance (Luma), color (Chroma), both color and luminance (Chroma and Luma), or the overall video signal (Smart Limit). 
  • Signal: Sets the minimum and maximum range for the effect.  Values outside this range are constrained.  Min and Max values change depending on the Reduction Axis option chosen.
  • Reduction Method: Sets the tonal range for compression based on Highlights, Midtones, Shadows, or a combination of these.
  • Shadow: Sets the Threshold and Softness of darker values.  Threshold adjusts the lower limit of darker values while Softness adjusts the boundary between tonal ranges.
  • Highlight: Sets the Threshold and Softness of lighter values.  Threshold adjusts the upper limit of lighter values while Softness adjusts the boundary between tonal ranges.

Loudness Normalization

See Automatic Loudness Correction for more information.

Video exports settings

Adobe Media Encoder is used both as a stand-alone application and as a component of Adobe Premiere Pro, After Effects, and Flash Professional. In some contexts—including rendering and exporting from Premiere Pro—you set encoding options in the full Adobe Media Encoder Export Settings dialog box. In other contexts—including rendering and exporting from After Effects—you set encoding options in a format-specific Options dialog box that only presents a subset of the encoding options.

Adobe Media Encoder ships with many presets, each of which sets the various options to meet the requirements for a common target output. In the Export Settings or format-specific Options dialog box, the options available on the Video tab depend on the format you’ve specified.

Options not documented here are either specific to the selected format or do not require documentation. For detailed information, consult the specifications for the selected format. For example, MPEG formats include many advanced options not listed here. For detailed information on options not listed, consult the specifications for the MPEG‑2 (ISO/IEC 13818) format and the Wikipedia website.

Note:

Some capture cards and plug-in software provide their own dialog boxes with specific options. If the options you see are different from the options described here, see the documentation for your capture card or plug‑in.

For general information about compression settings, see Compression tips.

TV Standard

Conforms the output to the NTSC standard or to the PAL standard. When set to Match Source, Adobe Media Encoder automatically sets this value to match the source. For example, if the source file frame rate is 25 fps, Adobe Media Encoder sets the TV standard to PAL.

Frame Dimensions

Dimensions, in pixels, of the output frame. When set to Match Source, Adobe Media Encoder automatically sets this value to match the frame dimensions of the source. (See Image aspect ratio and frame size.)

Frame Rate

Frame rate of the output file in frames per second. Some codecs support a specific set of frame rates. When set to Match Source, Adobe Media Encoder automatically sets this value to match the frame rate of the source. (See Frame rate.)

Field Order or Field Type

Specifies whether the output file has progressive frames or frames made up of interlaced fields, and if the latter, which field get written first. Progressive is the correct setting for computer display and motion picture film. Choose Upper First or Lower First when exporting video for an interlaced medium, such as NTSC, or PAL. When set to Match Source, Adobe Media Encoder automatically sets this value to match the field order of the source. (See Interlaced versus non-interlaced video.)

Aspect or Pixel Aspect Ratio

Select the pixel aspect ratio appropriate for the output type. When the pixel aspect ratio (displayed in parentheses) is 1.0, the output has square pixels; all others have non-square pixels. Because computers generally display pixels as squares, content using non‑square pixel aspect ratios appear stretched when viewed on a computer but appear with the correct proportions when viewed on a video monitor. When set to Match Source, in H.264 and MPEG-2 formats, Adobe Media Encoder automatically sets this value to match the pixel aspect ratio of the source. (See Pixel aspect ratio.)

Profile

Specifies whether Adobe Media Encoder uses the Baseline, Main, or High profile.

Note:

Profile and Level settings are relevant to formats that use variants of MPEG encoding, including H.264. Recommended settings are often a combination of Profile and Level settings. For example, a common recommendation for high-quality encoding for Internet distribution is a setting of High Profile, Level 5.1. For more information, see the Wikipedia website.

Level

Level used by Adobe Media Encoder, with ranges that differ depending on output format. The different level choices can constrain the Frame Size, Frame Rate, Field Order, Aspect, and Bit rate settings.

Export As Sequence

For still-image export, select this option to export as a sequentially numbered series of still-image files.

Header Type

Specifies SMPTE/DPX or Cineon header.

Depth

Color depth in bits per pixel.

Encoding Passes

Number of times the encoder analyzes the clip before encoding. Multiple passes increase the time it takes to encode the file, but generally result in more efficient compression and higher image quality.

M Frames

Number of B frames (bi‑directional frames) between consecutive I frames (intra‑frames) and P frames (predicted frames).

N Frames

Number of frames between I frames (intra‑frames). This value must be a multiple of the M frames value.

Closed GOP Every

Frequency of each closed group of pictures (closed GOP), which cannot reference frames outside the closed GOP. A GOP consists of a sequence of I, B, and P frames. (This option is available if you choose MPEG‑2 as the format.)

Bit rate

Number of megabits per second. Different formats present different bit rate options. The minimum bit rate differs according to the format. For example, for MPEG‑2 DVD, the minimum bit rate is 1.5 Mbps.

Bit rate Mode or Bit rate Encoding

Specifies the type of variable bit the codec produces in the exported file:

VBR, 1 Pass

Variable bit rate, with the encoder making a single pass through the file from beginning to end. Single-pass encoding takes less time than dual-pass encoding, but doesn’t achieve the same quality in the output.

VBR, 2 Pass

Variable bit rate, with the encoder making two passes through the file, from beginning to end, and then from end to beginning. The second pass prolongs the process, but it ensures greater encoding efficiency, and often a higher-quality output.

Note:

When comparing CBR and VBR files of the same content and file size, you can make the following generalizations: A CBR file may play back more reliably over a wider range of systems, because a fixed data rate is less demanding on a media player and computer processor. However, a VBR file tends to have a higher image quality, because VBR tailors the amount of compression to the image content.

Bit rate Level (H.264 Blu-ray, and MPEG-2 Blu-ray formats only)

When the Bit rate level is set to Custom, the output bit rate can be changed to any value. When the Bit rate Level is set to High, Medium, or Low, the bit rate is set automatically based on frame dimensions as a read-only value and cannot be changed. Adobe Media Encoder has default presets for the formats which have the Bit rate Level set to automatic.

Key Frame Interval [Seconds] or Set Key Frame Distance (Frames)

Number of frames after which the codec creates a keyframe when exporting video. (See Key frames.)

Optimize Stills or Expand Stills

Select this option to use still images efficiently in exported video files. For example, if a still image has a duration of 2 seconds in a project set to 30 fps, Adobe Premiere Pro creates one 2‑second frame instead of 60 frames at 1/30 of a second each. Selecting this option can save disk space for sequences and clips containing still images. Deselect this option only if the exported video file exhibits playback problems when displaying the still images.

Time interpolation settings

The Time Interpolation settings allow you to change the frame rate of the exported file by using Optical Flow to interpolate the missing frames. For example, if you have a 30 fps footage that you want to export at 60 fps without repeating every frame, you can export the media with the Optical Flow  option in the Time Interpolation drop-down list selected.

In some footage, using Optical Flow for creating smoother motion may not produce the desired results. In such scenarios, you can use one the other time interpolation options--Frame Sampling or Frame Blending. Frame Sampling repeats or removes frames as needed to reach the desired speed. Frame Blending repeats frames, but it also blends between them as needed to help smooth the motion. 

Multiplexer export settings

The Multiplexer preset options (sometimes called Format) control how MPEG video and audio data are merged into a single stream. The exact options available depend on the MPEG format you choose. Multiplexing settings are available for H.264 and HEVC formats as well

When you choose the MPEG‑2 format, all Multiplexer options provided by the MPEG standard are available for manual control. In most cases, it’s better to select an MPEG preset specifically targeted to your output medium (such as MPEG‑2 DVD).

For more information about MPEG options, see the relevant MPEG specifications for MPEG-4 (ISO/IEC 14496) and MPEG-2 (ISO/IEC 13818) and the Wikipedia website.

Audio export settings

In the Export Settings dialog box, the options available in the Audio tab depend on the format you’ve specified. Options not documented here are either specific to the selected format or do not require documentation because their names are self-documenting. For detailed information, consult the specifications for the selected format.

Some audio formats support only uncompressed audio, which has the highest quality but uses more disk space. Some formats provide only one codec. Others allow you to choose from a list of supported codecs.

Sample Rate

Choose a higher rate to increase the frequency at which audio is converted into discrete digital values, or sampled. Higher sample rates increase audio quality and file size; lower sample rates decrease quality and file size.

Setting the sample rate in the Export Settings dialog box higher than the sample rate of the audio source doesn’t increase quality. Setting a sample rate different from the sample rate of the source file requires resampling and extra processing time. You can avoid resampling by capturing audio at the same rate at which you want to export it. (See Compression tips.)

Channels or Output Channels

Specify how many audio channels are in the exported file. If you choose fewer channels than are in the master track of a sequence or project, Adobe Media Encoder downmixes the audio. The options available for many formats are Stereo, mono or 5.1.

Note:

QuickTime channelization option lets you save time and streamline your rendering by exporting multiple audio output configurations in the same QuickTime file, including stereo and 5.1 channelization.

Sample Size

Choose a higher bit depth to increase accuracy of audio samples. Higher bit depth can improve dynamic range and reduce distortion, especially if you add extra processing, such as filtering or resampling. Higher bit depths also increase processing time and file size; lower bit rates reduce processing time and file size.

Setting the bit depth in the Export Settings dialog box higher than the bit depth of the source audio doesn’t increase quality.

Bit rate [Kbps]

The output bit rate of the audio. Generally, higher bit rates increase both quality and file size.

Publish settings

Uploading to different destinations

Use the Publish tab to upload files to the following destinations:

  1. Adobe Creative Cloud
  2. Facebook
  3. FTP
  4. Vimeo
  5. YouTube
  6. Twitter
  7. Behance

Note:

If the current format is not supported by a publishing destination it is not displayed in the Publish tab. For example, Twitter is only available when the Format is set to 'H.264'. 

Media Encoder provides system presets to help you choose the best settings for YouTube, Facebook, Vimeo, and Twitter destinations.

Creative Cloud settings

Check the Creative Cloud box to copy exported file(s) from Adobe Media Encoder to your Creative Cloud folder, where they are synced to the cloud via the Creative Cloud desktop application. Files get copied to the root directory of the Creative Cloud folder by default.

The Creative Cloud option includes the following settings:

Creative Cloud folder

Creative Cloud folder where the files get copied to.

Add sub-folder

Sub-folder under the Creative Cloud folder to which the files are copied. You can create nested sub-folders by adding \ (backward-slash) for Windows and / (forward-slash) for Mac OS between folder names.

Note:

Ensure that you have enabled file synchronization under Preferences > Files > Sync On/Off in the CC desktop application.

If you close the Adobe Media Encoder application when uploads are in progress, a warning dialog is displayed that asks you if you want to finish uploading the files before closing the application.

Facebook settings

Check the Facebook settings box and login to Facebook to upload your encoded file to Facebook.

  1. Click the Log in button. You get redirected to the Facebook login page.
  2. Enter your credentials and allow Adobe Media Encoder to manage your Facebook videos.
  3. In the Privacy box, select your privacy setting.
  4. In the Description box, type a description for your video.
  5. To delete the local file after uploading to Facebook, select the Delete the local file after upload option. 

Watch this video to see how you can publish to Facebook: Publish to Facebook

Twitter settings

Check the Twitter settings box and login to Twitter to upload your encoded file to Twitter.

  1. Click the Log in button. You get redirected to the Twitter login page.
  2. Enter your credentials and allow Adobe Media Encoder to manage your Twitter videos.
  3. In the Status box, type a description for your video.
  4. To delete the local file after uploading to Twitter, select the Delete the local file after upload option. 

Watch this video to see how you can publish to Twitter: Publish to Twitter

Note:

Twitter videos should be 30 seconds or less in duration and the Status text should contain no more than 110 characters.

YouTube settings

Check the box next to the YouTube setting and log in to YouTube to be able to upload your encoded files to YouTube.

  1. Click the Log in button. You get redirected to the log in screen on the YouTube/Google site.
  2. Enter your credentials and allow Adobe Media Encoder to manage your YouTube videos.
  3. Close the browser. Adobe Media Encoder is brought back into focus automatically. The account you used to log in to YouTube is displayed under the Account setting.

Note:

If you deny permission to Adobe Media Encoder to manage your YouTube videos, you see an "Authorization denied" message and you get taken back to the Adobe Media Encoder application.

The YouTube option has the following settings:

Privacy

Set the privacy settings for who can view your video:

  • Private
  • Public
  • Unlisted (default)

Tags

Add words separated by commas to create keywords for the uploaded video.

Description

Enter a description for your uploaded video.

Delete local file after upload

(Check box) If checked, deletes the local copy of the uploaded file.

Vimeo settings

Check the box next to the Vimeo setting and log in to Vimeo to upload your encoded files to Vimeo.

  1. Click the Log in button. You get redirected to the log in screen on the Vimeo site.
  2. Enter your credentials and permit Adobe Media Encoder to manage your Vimeo videos.
  3. Close the browser. The focus is brought back to Adobe Media Encoder automatically. The account you used to log in to Vimeo is displayed under the Account setting.

Note:

If you deny permission to Adobe Media Encoder to manage your Vimeo videos, you see an "Authorization denied" message and you get taken back to the Adobe Media Encoder application.

The Vimeo option has the following settings:

Viewable by

Set the preference so that your videos are viewable by:

  • Only me (default)
  • Anybody
  • Anybody with a password

Password

Set the password so that your videos are viewable by anybody who has the password. This option is enabled only when Viewable by is set to Anybody with a password.

Tags

Add words separated by commas to create keywords for the uploaded video.

Description

Enter a description for your uploaded video.

Delete local file after upload

(Check box) If checked, deletes the local copy of the uploaded file.

Behance settings

Check the box next to Behance setting and log in to upload your encoded files to Behance.

  1. Click the Log in button. You get redirected to the Behance login page.  
  2. Enter your credentials and allow Adobe Media Encoder to manage your Behance videos.
  3. In the Tag field, add words separated by commas to create keywords for the uploaded video. Since this is a required field, you cannot leave it blank.
  4. To delete the local file after uploading to Behance, select the Delete the local file after upload option.
Behance Settings
Behance Settings

FTP settings

Check the FTP box to upload the exported file to a File Transfer Protocol (FTP) server that has storage space allocated for file sharing. FTP is a common method for transferring files over a network and is especially useful for sharing relatively large files using an Internet connection. The server’s administrator can provide you with the details for connecting to the server.

The FTP option includes the following settings:

Username

User's identity, as specified by the server administrator.

Password

User password required to log in to the server.

Server

Enter the DNS or IP address of the server on which the FTP site is located.

Port

The number assigned to the FTP server’s command port, which is 21 by default.

Remote Path

The location on the FTP server to access, expressed as a file path.

Retries

Number of attempts to contact the server if a connection isn’t established.

Delete local file after transfer

(Check box) If checked, deletes the local copy of the exported file after the file has been uploaded to the FTP server.

Export and thin XMP metadata

You can choose what XMP metadata (if any) to include in the output file.

To open the Metadata Export dialog box, click the Metadata button in the lower-right corner of the Export Settings dialog box.

Note:

You can perform many of the same actions in the Metadata category in the Preferences dialog box. (See Preferences.) Changes made in the Preferences dialog box don’t apply to selected items in the encoding queue, but the templates and rules are available for later assignment through the Metadata Export dialog box.

Specifying how and whether to include XMP metadata on output

Use the Export Options menu to specify whether XMP metadata should be embedded in the output file, stored in a sidecar (.xmp) file, both, or neither.

If you choose None, then no XMP metadata from the source gets embedded in the file, and none of the other controls for XMP metadata export are available. Basic XMP metadata about the exported file—such as export settings and start timecode—is always exported, even when None is chosen.

Note:

The Embed In Output File options are disabled for files of kinds for which XMP metadata can’t be embedded.

Preserving XMP metadata from sources

Many source assets contain XMP metadata. You can choose which XMP metadata from source assets should be preserved in the encoded output files by using a preservation rule.

For single-source clips, preserving XMP metadata ensures that the production metadata from the original source flows through to the re-encoded output file. For sequences and compositions, including source metadata preserves the metadata from each of the items used to make up that sequence or composition. Excluding existing source metadata is often referred to as thinning. You may want to exclude source metadata for security purposes or privacy concerns, or to reduce the size of the output file as much as possible.

A preservation rule acts as a filter to specify which XMP metadata from a source item is passed through to an encoded output file. The preset preservation rules are Preserve All and Exclude All. Preserve All is the default.

To create your own preservation rule, click New next to the Preservation Rules menu. You can enable individual fields or categories by selecting them in the Preservation Rules Editor dialog box. To find specific fields, use the search field near the top of the Preservation Rules Editor dialog box. Be sure to give your preservation rule a descriptive name.

You can edit an existing custom preservation rule by choosing it from the Preservation Rules menu and clicking Edit.

Two kinds of source XMP metadata are handled separately from the source XMP metadata controlled by the preservation rules: sequence markers and the XMP metadata that is created by the speech analysis features in Adobe Premiere Pro. To include the speech XMP metadata and sequence markers, select Export Master Speech Track And Sequence Markers.

Note:

Speech-to-text has been removed in the latest release of Adobe Media Encoder. However, any speech to text metadata that has already been generated can be used in exactly the same way as it was before.

Adding XMP metadata

An export template specifies what XMP metadata get written to the output file. For example, you can create an export template that includes various XMP metadata from the source files as well as adding your contact information and rights-management information to each output file.

The export template acts as a filter; any fields that are not explicitly enabled by the current template are filtered out. The only exceptions are internal properties that are automatically populated with data by the creator application, which are always included and are not editable.

To create your own export template, click New next to the Export Template menu. You can enable individual fields or categories by selecting them in the Export Template Editor dialog box. To find specific fields, use the search field near the top of the Export Template Editor dialog box. Be sure to give your export template a descriptive name.

You can edit an existing custom export template by choosing it from the Export Template menu and clicking Edit.

After you have applied an export template, you can also manually enter values to add specific XMP metadata to the current encoding queue items.

Some fields are uneditable and can’t be excluded from output—such as fields that are written automatically by the creator application. For example, the Format field in the Dublin Core schema and the Video Frame Rate field in the Dynamic Media schema are set by Adobe Media Encoder to accurately describe the output file, and these fields are not user-editable. Also, values that are specified by the current export template appear as uneditable; to change these values, change the template or apply a different template.

Any field that doesn’t contain data—either from the template or manually entered—get excluded from the exported XMP metadata. Empty fields are not written to the output file.

Match Source presets

When exporting video files in DPX, BMP, DNxHD MXF OP1a, H.264, HEVC, JPEG, MPEG, OpenEXR, PNG, QuickTime, Targa, and TIFF formats, Adobe Media Encoder lets you automatically match the video settings of the source file using Match Source presets. 

Closed Captions

Closed captions are typically used to display the audio portion of a video as text on televisions and other devices that support the display of closed captions.

See the Exporting Closed Caption data section for detailed information.

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