Add a clip to a sequence

You can add clips to a sequence in the following ways:

  • Drag the clip from the Project panel or Source Monitor to a Timeline panel or the Program Monitor.

  • Use the Insert and Overwrite buttons in the Source Monitor to add clips to a Timeline panel. Or use the keyboard shortcuts associated with those buttons.

  • Automatically assemble a sequence from the Project panel.

  • Drag the clip from the Project panel, Source panel, or Media Browser into the Program monitor.


An overwrite edit adds a clip by replacing any frames already in a sequence starting from the edit point and extending for the length of the clip. Overwrite is the default method when dragging a clip to a sequence or when rearranging clips in a sequence.

With an insert edit, adding a clip to the sequence forces any clips later in time to shift forward to accommodate the new clip. When dragging a clip, press the Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS) key to shift into insert mode.

Note:

If one or more tracks is locked, an insert edit shifts clips in all unlocked tracks. To prevent an insert edit from shifting clips in a track, lock the track. Alternatively, click the Sync Lock button in the header of every track you want to shift.

Open a sequence

  • In a Project panel, double-click a sequence.

    The sequence opens in a Timeline panel.

Target tracks

A sequence may contain several video and audio tracks. When you add a clip to a sequence, it is important to assign which track or tracks it is to be edited to. You can target one or more tracks, for both audio and video. Target tracks depending on the editing method you use: editing from the Source Monitor, dragging, or copy/pasting to the timeline.

  • In advance of making an insert or overwrite edit, you can map the tracks of a clip loaded in the Source Monitor to one or more tracks of a sequence by dragging the source track indicator representing each of the source clip’s tracks into one or more selected tracks of the sequence. Audio source track indicators can be placed only in audio tracks matching the source clip’s channel configuration. For example, the audio track indicator for a stereo clip can be placed only in a stereo track in a sequence. After the tracks are targeted, edit the clip by pressing the Insert or Overwrite buttons (or use the shortcuts).

  • When you drag a clip to a sequence as an insert or overwrite edit by dragging, you target the track automatically by dropping the clip into the track. You do not need to specify tracks in advance. A drag edit is an overwrite edit by default. If you are performing an insert edit with the clip, press Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS) as you drag. As you make the edit, triangles appear showing the affected tracks.

  • When you add clips to a sequence by pasting, (or keyboard shortcuts), you must specify target tracks in advance. You can target more than one video track or more than one audio track at a time. Also, you can choose to target a video track only or an audio track only. Click the track or tracks you want to target in the track header area of a Timeline panel. The track header area for a targeted track appears highlighted.

Note:

You can also assign keyboard shortcuts to some track targeting commands.

If you overwrite a clip, only the clips in targeted tracks are affected, whether you drag the clip or use a Source Monitor’s Overwrite button.

If you insert a clip, the clip goes into the targeted tracks, and clips in any unlocked tracks where the source clip lands shift to accommodate the insertion. You can specify other tracks to also shift by enabling Sync Lock on them.

Note:

To insert a clip and not shift clips in other tracks, Ctrl-Alt-drag (Windows) or Command-Option-drag (Mac OS) the clip into the track.

You can drag video clips to any video track; however, you can drag audio clips only to a compatible audio track. Audio clips can’t be added to the master audio track or submix tracks, and they can be placed only on audio tracks of the matching channel type: mono, stereo, or 5.1 (see Audio tracks in a sequence).

Clips with linked video and audio can be dragged to either a video or an audio track, but the clip’s video and audio components appear separately, in the appropriate corresponding tracks.

Note:

You can drag a clip to any unlocked, compatible track in a sequence, no matter which tracks are currently targeted. You can’t target a locked track. Locking a target track deselects it as the target.

Drag video and audio to a sequence

By default, when dropped into a sequence, the video and audio components of linked clips appear in corresponding tracks (for example, Video 1 and Audio 1), unless the audio channel type of the clip is incompatible with the target track. In this case, the linked audio appears in the next compatible track, or a compatible track is created automatically.

Note:

An audio clip dragged to an incompatible track automatically shifts to the next compatible track, even if the track is occupied by another audio clip. Therefore, take care not to disturb clips already in the sequence.

However, you can alter this behavior by holding the Shift key while you drag.

Note:

For information about creating tracks that are compatible with your assets, see Work with tracks and Create a custom sequence preset.

The Program Monitor can help you determine where to position a clip you’re adding to a sequence. During an overwrite edit, it displays the frames in the sequence adjacent to the new clip’s head and tail. During an insert edit, it displays the frames adjacent to the insertion point.

  1. (Optional) Open a clip in the Source Monitor, and mark its In and Out points. (See Working with In and Out points.)

    Note:

    If you don’t want to set In and Out points, you can drag the clip directly from a bin or the preview thumbnail in the Project panel.

  2. To make clip edges align when you drag them, make sure that the Snap button is active in a Timeline panel.
  3. Do one of the following:
    • To drag the video and audio portions of a clip to specific tracks, drag the clip from the Source Monitor or Project panel into a Timeline. When the video portion of the clip lies above the desired video track, press and hold Shift. Continue holding shift, and drag downward past the bar separating video and audio tracks. When the audio portion of the clip lies above the desired audio track, release the mouse and release Shift.

    • To drag the video portion of a clip to the Video 1 track and the audio to any audio track, drag the clip from the Source Monitor or Project panel past the line that separates the video tracks from the audio tracks. Drop the clip above the audio track where you want the audio portion to land. The video portion of the clip will remain in the Video 1 track, and the audio portion lands in the desired audio track.

    • To perform an overwrite edit, drag the clip from the Source Monitor or Project panel to an appropriate track in a Timeline panel at the point you want the clip to start. The destination area is highlighted, and the pointer appears with the Overwrite icon .

    • To perform an insert edit, Ctrl-drag (Windows) or Command-drag (Mac OS) the clip from the Source Monitor or Project panel to an appropriate track in a Timeline panel at the point you want the clip to start. The destination area is highlighted, and the pointer appears with the Insert icon . Arrows appear at the insertion point in all tracks.

    • To perform an insert edit and shift only target tracks, Ctrl+Alt-drag (Windows) or Command+Option-drag (Mac OS) the clip from the Source Monitor or Project panel to an appropriate track in a Timeline panel at the point you want the clip to start. The destination area is highlighted, and the pointer appears with the Insert icon . Arrows appear at the insertion point only in the tracks to which the clip is added.

    • (Roman keyboards only) To zoom into or out of a clip as you drop it into a Timeline panel, drag and press the equal sign key (=) to increase the zoom factor or press the minus sign key (–) to decrease it. Do not use the keys on the number pad.

    The clip will land in a Timeline panel, and a Timeline panel will become active, making it easy to playback the clip just added to the sequence.

Note:

You can also drag, or Ctrl-drag (Windows) or Command-drag (Mac OS), a clip into the Program Monitor to overwrite or insert a clip. Make sure the track you want is targeted in a Timeline panel and the playhead is at the location where you want to add the clip in the sequence. To prevent an insert edit from shifting clips in any track, turn off Sync Lock for that track, or alternatively, lock the track.

Drag video only or audio only to a sequence

You can add the video track, the audio tracks, or both types of tracks of a clip to a sequence. When you drag a clip from the Project panel or from the main viewing area of the Source Monitor, you automatically add both types of tracks. If you want to add only one type of track, add it from the Source Monitor.

  1. Double-click a clip in a Project panel or Timeline panel to open it in the Source Monitor.
  2. In the Source Monitor, do one of the following:
    • To drag all audio and video tracks of the clip, drag from anywhere inside the main viewing area.

    • To drag only the video track of the clip, drag from the Drag Video Only icon .

    • To drag only the audio tracks, first target in the Timeline panel the tracks you want to receive the clip audio tracks. Then map the audio tracks you want to use to the target audio tracks. Then, drag from the Drag Audio Only icon .

    Note:

    Drag Video Only and Drag Audio Only are not buttons. They are icons that provide a place to click when starting the respective drag operations.

Add a track while adding a clip

  • Drag a clip from the Project panel or Source Monitor into the blank space above the topmost video track (for a video or linked clip) or below the lowest audio track (for an audio or linked clip). Premiere Pro adds an audio track, a video track, or both, depending on the content of the source clip.

    Note:

    If the sequence doesn’t have an unlocked track of the correct media type (for example, a stereo audio track for a stereo source clip), a new track is created to accommodate the clip.

Insert a clip into a sequence

  1. Double-click a clip in a Project panel or sequence to open it in the Source Monitor.
  2. Place the playhead at the point in the sequence where you want to insert the clip.
  3. In the Timeline panel, click the headers of the tracks where you want to insert the source clip’s components to target them.
  4. Drag the source clip track indicators to the headers of the tracks where you want to insert the source clip’s components.
  5. Click the Sync Lock box in the header of any track you want to shift as a result of the insertion.

    Note:

    Any track that is either targeted or sync-lock-enabled will be affected by Insert; only non-targeted tracks with Sync Lock disabled will be unaffected. If a track has no source track indicator, or if the track is not targeted but is operated on because its Sync Lock is enabled, then an empty track background will be inserted on that track at the CTI for the duration of the source clip

  6. In the Source Monitor, click the Insert button .

The audio and video components of the clip will be inserted into the tracks selected at the playhead. Clips to the right of its location on its own track and tracks with Sync Lock enabled will shift to the right by the length of the inserted clip.

Overwrite a clip into a sequence

  1. Double-click a clip in a Project panel or sequence to open it in the Source Monitor.
  2. Place the playhead at the point in the sequence where you want to overwrite the clip.
  3. Click the headers of the tracks where you want to overwrite the source clip components to target them.
  4. Drag the source clip track indicators to the headers of the tracks where you want to overwrite the source clip components.

    Note:

    During an overwrite edit, if a targeted track has no source track indicator, then an empty track background will be inserted on that track for the duration of the source clip, removing any previous contents at that location

  5. In the Source Monitor, click the Overwrite button .

The audio and video components of the clip will be overlaid onto the tracks selected at the playhead.

Insert or Overwrite by dragging a clip to the Program panel

You can select and drag a clip from the Project panel, Source panel, or Media Browser into the Program monitor. When doing so, an overlay appears in monitor to provide a visual depiction of Overwrite versus Insert edits. A tool tip appears to describe the modifier key used to toggle between these different types of edits. To perform an Insert or Overwrite edit by dragging a clip to the Program panel, do the following:

  • Drag-and-drop to overwrite edit (default drag, no modifier).

  • Drag-and-drop to Insert edit (hold down Command/Ctrl key modifier).

The clip, or clips that can be dragged to the Program panel can either be from the Project panel, or the Media Browser. They can be AV, video only, or audio only clips.

When a clip is dragged from the Project panel or the Media Browser into the Program monitor's video display area, the Overwrite overlay appears by default when no modifier key is held down. A tool tip is displayed underneath the clip's thumbnail image, to drop (mouse release) to create an overwrite edit, and that holding down the Command/Ctrl key creates an insert edit instead.

Multiple clips dragged to the Program monitor do not display a multiple clip stack icon. The file stack clip icon does not truly depict the number of clips being dragged.

When the modifier key is held down, the overlay updates to display the Insert edit overlay. You can toggle back and forth between the Overwrite/Insert modes in the middle of the drag-and-drop action. Hold down the modifier key and the overlay displays update.

Make three-point and four-point edits

The Source and Program Monitors provide controls to perform three-point and four-point edits—standard techniques in traditional video editing.

In a three-point edit, you mark either two In points and one Out point, or two Out points and one In point. You don’t have to actively set the fourth point; it’s inferred by the other three. For example, in a typical three-point edit you would specify the starting and ending frames of the source clip (the source In and Out points), and when you want the clip to begin in the sequence (the sequence In point). Where the clip ends in the sequence—the unspecified sequence Out point—is automatically determined by the three points you defined. However, any combination of three points accomplishes an edit. For example, sometimes the point where a clip ends in a sequence is more critical than where it begins. In this case, the three points include source In and Out points, and a sequence Out point. On the other hand, if you need the clip to begin and end at particular points in the sequence—say, perfectly over a line of voice-over narration—you could set two points in the sequence, and only one point in the source.

In a four-point edit, you mark source In and Out points and sequence In and Out points. A four-point edit is useful when the starting and ending frames in both the source clip and sequence are critical. If the marked source and sequence durations are different, Premiere Pro alerts you to the discrepancy and provides alternatives to resolve it.

Make a three-point edit

  1. In a Project panel, double-click a clip to open it in the Source Monitor.
  2. Click the headers of the tracks in a Timeline panel into which you want to add the clip to target them.
  3. In the Timeline, drag the source track indicators to the headers of the tracks into which you want the clip components to fall.
  4. In the Source and Program Monitors, mark any combination of three In and Out points.
  5. In the Source Monitor, do one of the following:
    • To perform an insert edit, click the Insert button .

    • To perform an overwrite edit, click the Overwrite button .

Make a four-point edit

  1. In a Project panel, double-click a clip to open it in the Source Monitor.
  2. Click the headers of the tracks in a Timeline panel into which you want to add the clip to target them.
  3. In the Timeline, drag the source track indicators to the headers of the tracks into which you want the clip components to fall.
  4. Using the Source Monitor, mark an In point and an Out point for the source clip.
  5. In the Program Monitor, mark an In point and an Out point in the sequence.
  6. in the Source Monitor, do one of the following:
    • To perform an insert edit, click the Insert button

    • To perform an insert edit and shift clips in target tracks only, Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac OS) the Insert button .

    • To perform an overwrite edit, click the Overwrite button .

  7. If the marked source and program durations differ, select an option when prompted:

    Change Clip Speed (Fit to Fill)

    Maintains the source clip’s In and Out points, but changes the clip’s speed so that its duration matches the duration determined by the sequence In and Out points.

    Trim Clip’s Head (Left Side)

    Automatically changes the source clip’s In point so that its duration matches the duration determined by the sequence In and Out points.

    Trim Clip’s Tail (Right Side)

    Automatically changes the source clip’s Out point so that its duration matches the duration determined by the sequence In and Out points.

    Ignore Sequence In Point

    Disregards the sequence In point you set, and performs a three-point edit.

    Ignore Sequence Out Point

    Disregards the sequence Out point you set, and performs a three-point edit.

Add clips to a sequence automatically

You can quickly assemble a rough cut or add clips to an existing sequence. The clips added can include the default video and audio transitions.

  1. Set In and Out points to define each clip’s starting and ending points.
  2. Arrange clips in the Project panel. You can add the clips to the sequence in either the order you select them, or in the order that they are arranged in a bin in icon view. You can also add sequences or clips in nested bins.

    Note:

    You can arrange clips in a bin in storyboard fashion by setting the Project panel to icon view. (See Change Project panel views.)

  3. Select the clips in the Project panel. Either Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) them in the order you want or by dragging a selection marquee around them.
  4. In the Project panel, click the Automate To Sequence button .
  5. Set the following options in the Automate To Sequence dialog box, and then click OK:

    Ordering

    Specifies the method used to determine the order of the clips when they are added to the sequence. If you choose Sort Order, clips are added in the order they’re listed in the Project panel: from top to bottom in List view; or from left to right, top to bottom in Icon view. If you choose Selection Order, clips are added according to the order in which you selected them in the Project panel.

    Placement

    Specifies how clips are placed in the sequence. If you choose Sequentially, clips are placed one after another. If you choose At Unnumbered Markers, clips are placed at unnumbered sequence markers. Choosing At Unnumbered Markers makes the Transitions options unavailable.

    Method

    Specifies the type of edit to perform. Choose Insert Edit to add clips to the sequence starting at the sequence’s current time using insert edits, which shift existing clips forward in time to accommodate the new material. Choose Overwrite Edit to use overwrite edits, which allow the new material to replace clips already in the sequence.

    Note:

    The Automate To Sequence command disregards target tracks and always uses the lowest available video and audio tracks. For example, if Video1 and Audio1 are locked, it will automate to Video 2 and Audio 2, or the lowest audio track with the correct channel type.

    Clip Overlap

    Specifies the duration of the transition and how much to adjust the clips’ In and Out points to compensate for it when Apply Default Audio Transition or Apply Default Video Transition is selected. For example, a value of 30 frames trims the clips’ In and Out points 15 frames at each edit, where a 30-frame transition is added. The default value of this option is 15 frames. A menu lets you set the units to frames or seconds.

    Apply Default Audio Transition

    Creates an audio crossfade at each audio edit, using the default audio transition (defined in the Effects panel). This option is available only when audio tracks are present in selected clips, and the Placement option is set to Sequentially. It has no effect when the Clip Overlap option is set to zero.

    Apply Default Video Transition

    Places the default transition (defined in the Effects panel) at each edit. This option is available only when the Placement option is set to Sequentially, and has no effect when the Clip Overlap option is set to zero.

    Ignore Audio

    Ignores the audio in clips selected to be automated to the sequence.

    Ignore Video

    Ignores the video in clips selected to be automated to the sequence.

Mixing clip types in a sequence

You can mix clips with different frame rates, frame aspect ratios, and frame sizes in the same sequence. For example, if you drop an HD clip into a sequence in an SD project, the clip will be letter-boxed and scaled to the SD frame size automatically. Similarly, if you drop an SD clip into a sequence in an HD project, the clip will be pillar-boxed automatically.

A render bar will appear above any clip in a Timeline panel with attributes not matching the sequence settings. The render bar indicates that those clips will have to be rendered before final output. However, it doesn't necessarily indicate these clips can't be previewed in real-time. If a yellow render bar appears above the clip, Premiere Pro can probably play it back in real time without rendering. If, however, a red render bar appears above the clip, Premiere Pro probably can not play it back in real time without rendering.

A clip with a frame rate different from the frame rate of the sequence will play back from a sequence at the frame rate of the sequence.

Replace one clip with another in a Timeline

You can replace one clip in a Timeline panel with another from the Source Monitor or a bin, retaining any effects that were applied to the original clip in a Timeline.

Using one of the following keyboard modifiers, drag a clip from the Project panel or Source Monitor onto a clip in a Timeline panel:

  • To use the In point of the new clip, Alt-drag (Windows) or Option-drag (Mac OS). You may use the In point of the new clip, for example, if you have already trimmed it to start at the desired point of the action.
  • To apply the In point of the original clip to the new clip, Shift-Alt-drag (Windows) or Shift-Option-drag (Mac OS). You may apply the In point of the original clip to the new clip, for example, if the new clip was shot synchronously with the original clip using another camera. In this case, applying the In point from the original clip will start the new clip from the same point in the action.

In a Timeline, clip position and effects are preserved, and any effects that were applied to the original clip are applied to the replacement clip.

Note:

You can also replace a clip in a Timeline by selecting it, selecting a replacement clip in a bin or the Source Monitor, and then selecting Clip > Replace With Clip > [replacement type].

Replace the source footage for a clip

You can replace the source footage for any clip in the Project panel. Replacing the source footage for a clip links it to a new source file. All instances of the clip and its subclips are retained in the Project panel and Timeline, with their In and Out points, and any applied effects, intact. However, the clip becomes linked to the replacement footage instead of its original footage. You can easily replace, for example, placeholder footage with final footage, or footage with a soundtrack in one language with identical footage with a different-language soundtrack, and keep all the same edits that were made with the original footage.

  1. In the Project panel, select the clip for which you want new source footage.
  2. Select Clip > Replace Footage.
  3. In the Replace Footage For dialog box, browse to the file containing the replacement footage.
  4. To rename the clip with the replacement footage filename, check Rename Clip To Filename.
  5. Click Select.

Note:

You cannot use the Edit > Undo command to undo a footage replacement. However, you can use the Clip > Replace Footage command again to relink a clip to its original source file.

Set or remove sequence In and Out points

You can use In and Out points in a sequence to help you place and rearrange clips.

Note:

Sequence In and Out points are automatically removed when you perform a lift or extract edit from the Program Monitor.

Set sequence In and Out points

  1. Navigate to the In point in a Timeline panel and click the Set In Point button in the Program Monitor.
  2. Navigate to the Out point in a Timeline panel and click the Set Out Point button .

    Note:

    You can move the In and Out points together without affecting the duration by dragging the In/Out Grip (textured area at the center of the shaded span between the In and Out points) in the Program Monitor or Timeline panel.

Set sequence In and Out points around a selection

  1. In a Timeline panel, select one or more clips, or a gap, in the sequence.
  2. Choose Marker > Mark Selection. This sets sequence In and Out points that match the selection’s In and Out points.

    To set sequence In and Out points that match a clip’s In and Out points, select Marker > Mark Clip.

    Note:

    This command is particularly useful when replacing or removing clips in the sequence using three- and four-point editing methods. (See Make three-point and four-point edits.)

Remove sequence In and Out points

  1. Make sure that the sequence is open in the Program Monitor.
  2. Choose Marker > Clear Sequence Marker, and then choose an option to clear the In point, the Out point, or both.

    Note:

    You can also clear an In or Out point by Alt-clicking (Windows) or Option-clicking (Mac OS) the Set In button  or the Set Out button .

Set sequence start time

By default, each sequence’s time ruler starts at zero and measures time according to the timecode format you specified in the Display Format field of the New Sequence dialog box General tab. However, you can change the starting time of the sequence’s time ruler. For example, you may want to set the start time to match a master tape, which typically begins at 00;58;00;00, to accommodate a two-minute leader before the standard program start time of 01;00;00;00.

  • In a Timeline panel menu, choose Start Time, and enter a starting timecode, and click OK. (The starting time must be a positive number.)

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