Common settings for sharing

  1. Adobe Premiere Elements User Guide
  2. Introduction to Adobe Premiere Elements
    1. What's new in Premiere Elements
    2. System requirements | Adobe Premiere Elements
    3. Workspace basics
    4. Guided mode
    5. Use pan and zoom to create video-like effect
    6. GPU accelerated rendering
  3. Workspace and workflow
    1. Get to know the Home screen
    2. View and share auto-created collages, slideshows, and more
    3. Workspace basics
    4. Preferences
    5. Tools
    6. Keyboard shortcuts
    7. Audio View
    8. Undoing changes
    9. Customizing shortcuts
    10. Working with scratch disks
  4. Working with projects
    1. Creating a project
    2. Adjust project settings and presets
    3. Save and back up projects
    4. Previewing movies
    5. Creating video collage
    6. Create a video story
    7. Creating Instant Movies
    8. Viewing clip properties
    9. Viewing a project's files
    10. Archiving projects
    11. GPU accelerated rendering
  5. Importing and adding media
    1. Add media
    2. Guidelines for adding files
    3. Set duration for imported still images
    4. 5.1 audio import
    5. Working with offline files
    6. Sharing files between Adobe Premiere Elements and Adobe Photoshop Elements
    7. Creating specialty clips
    8. Work with aspect ratios and field options
  6. Arranging clips
    1. Arrange clips in the Expert view timeline
    2. Group, link, and disable clips
    3. Arranging clips in the Quick view timeline
    4. Working with clip and timeline markers
  7. Editing clips
    1. Reduce noise
    2. Select object
    3. Candid Moments
    4. Smart Trim
    5. Change clip speed and duration
    6. Split clips
    7. Freeze and hold frames
    8. Adjusting Brightness, Contrast, and Color - Guided Edit
    9. Stabilize video footage with Shake Stabilizer
    10. Replace footage
    11. Working with source clips
    12. Trimming Unwanted Frames - Guided Edit
    13. Trim clips
    14. Editing frames with Auto Smart Tone
  8. Applying transitions
    1. Applying transitions to clips
    2. Transition basics
    3. Adjusting transitions
    4. Adding Transitions between video clips - Guided Edit
    5. Create special transitions
    6. Create a Luma Fade Transition effect - Guided Edit
  9. Special effects basics
    1. Effects reference
    2. Applying and removing effects
    3. Create a black and white video with a color pop - Guided Edit
    4. Time remapping - Guided edit
    5. Effects basics
    6. Working with effect presets
    7. Finding and organizing effects
    8. Editing frames with Auto Smart Tone
    9. Fill Frame - Guided edit
    10. Create a time-lapse - Guided edit
    11. Best practices to create a time-lapse video
  10. Applying special effects
    1. Use pan and zoom to create video-like effect
    2. Transparency and superimposing
    3. Reposition, scale, or rotate clips with the Motion effect
    4. Apply an Effects Mask to your video
    5. Adjust temperature and tint
    6. Create a Glass Pane effect - Guided Edit
    7. Create a picture-in-picture overlay
    8. Applying effects using Adjustment layers
    9. Adding Title to your movie
    10. Removing haze
    11. Creating a Picture in Picture - Guided Edit
    12. Create a Vignetting effect
    13. Add a Split Tone Effect
    14. Add FilmLooks effects
    15. Add an HSL Tuner effect
    16. Fill Frame - Guided edit
    17. Create a time-lapse - Guided edit
    18. Animated Sky - Guided edit
    19. Select object
    20. Animated Mattes - Guided Edit
    21. Double exposure- Guided Edit
  11. Special audio effects
    1. Mix audio and adjust volume with Adobe Premiere Elements
    2. Adding sound effects to a video
    3. Adding music to video clips
    4. Create narrations
    5. Using soundtracks
    6. Music Remix
    7. Adding Narration to your movie - Guided Edit
    8. Adding Scores to your movie - Guided edit
  12. Movie titles
    1. Creating titles
    2. Adding shapes and images to titles
    3. Adding color and shadows to titles
    4. Editing and formatting text
    5. Motion Titles
    6. Exporting and importing titles
    7. Arranging objects in titles
    8. Designing titles for TV
    9. Applying styles to text and graphics
    10. Adding a video in the title
  13. Disc menus
    1. Creating disc menus
    2. Working with menu markers
    3. Types of discs and menu options
    4. Previewing menus
  14. Sharing and exporting your movies
    1. Export and share your videos
    2. Sharing for PC playback
    3. Compression and data-rate basics
    4. Common settings for sharing

Customize settings for sharing

Regardless of the file type you choose for sharing, the presets (default settings) are adequate for most applications and produce high‑quality results. However, you can change them if you have specific requirements not addressed by the presets. You can specify custom settings when sharing using the Computer or Mobile Phones And Players options.

Note:

Changing the Advanced settings without an in‑depth understanding of video can produce undesirable results during playback.

Export settings don’t update as you work on your project; however, it’s a good idea to make sure that all export settings are still appropriate. When you change an option, you create a preset that you can name, save, and subsequently use in later projects. All presets that you create are listed in the Preset menu with the default presets in Publish And Share panel.

Some capture‑card software and plug‑in software provide their own dialog boxes with specific options. If the options you see are different from those described in this user guide, refer to the documentation for your capture card or plug‑in.

Customize Advanced Share settings

When you share a file using one of the options in the Publish And Share panel, you can customize options and save custom presets in the Export Settings dialog box.

  1. In the Export & Share panel, select Devices, Audio or Image as per your requirements.

  2. Click Custom and then click Advanced Settings.

  3. In the Export Settings dialog box, select Export Video, Export Audio, or both at the top of the dialog box to indicate which types of tracks to export.
  4. Click the tab for the category that you want to adjust (Format, Video, Audio, Multiplexer, or Audiences), and adjust the corresponding options in the panel. The tabs and options displayed depend on the export type you chose.
  5. After adjusting your options, click OK.
  6. In the Choose Name dialog box, type a name for your preset and click OK.

Video settings

The following options are available in the Video panel of the Export Settings dialog box (you see these when you share a project using the Computer or Mobile Phones And Players options). Not all options are available for all presets.

Export Video

Exports the video tracks. Deselect to prevent exporting video tracks.

Export Audio

Exports the audio tracks. Deselect to prevent exporting audio tracks.

Video Codec

Specifies the codec, or compression scheme, available on your system.

Quality

Specifies the level of quality for the final file. A setting of 3.0 is a good general setting; however, video with lots of motion may benefit from a higher setting. The higher the quality setting, the longer it takes to render the file.

TV Standard

Conforms the output to the NTSC or PAL standard.

Frame Width [pixels]

Scales the output frame’s horizontal aspect to the specified width.

Frame Height [pixels]

Scales the output frame’s vertical aspect to the specified height.

Frame Rate [fps]

Specifies the output frame rate for either NTSC or PAL formats.

Field Order (or Fields)

Specifies whether the output file’s frames are interlaced, and if so, whether the upper or lower field is dominant. No Fields (Progressive Scan) is the equivalent of progressive scan, the correct setting for computer display and motion‑picture film. Choose Upper Field First or Lower Field First (the default) when exporting video for an interlaced medium such as NTSC, PAL, or SECAM. DV footage is generally Lower Field First. However, some newer nontape camcorders produce video with reverse field order, so make sure to check your camcorder’s documentation.

Pixel Aspect Ratio

Specifies the ratio of each pixel’s width to its height, which determines the number of pixels required to achieve a given frame aspect ratio. Some formats specify square pixels, while others use nonsquare pixels.

Keyframe Intervals (seconds)

Specifies the number of seconds after which the codec will create a keyframe when exporting video.

Bitrate Encoding

Specifies whether the codec achieves a constant or variable bitrate in the exported file.

In general, a frame is complex and more difficult to compress efficiently if it contains great detail, or if it significantly differs from surrounding frames, as it would in a scene containing motion.

note: When comparing CBR and VBR files of the same content and file size, a CBR file may play back more reliably over a wider range of systems, because a fixed data rate is less demanding on a media player and computer processor. However, a VBR file tends to have a higher image quality, because VBR tailors the amount of compression to the image content.

CBR

Constant Bitrate (CBR) keeps the data rate of the exported file constant within a fixed limit you specify. Since the complex sections are held to the same bitrate as the simple, they are more likely to show the quality-degrading artifacts of compression.

VBR

Variable Bitrate (VBR) allows the exported file’s data rate to vary within a range you specify, allocating higher bitrates, and therefore less compression, to the more complex sections and lower bitrates to the less complex.

Bitrate

Specifies the number of megabits per second you want the encoded file to have. This option only appears if you select CBR as the Bitrate Encoding option.

The following options appear only if you select VBR as the Bitrate Encoding option:

Minimum Bitrate [Mbps]

Specifies the minimum number of megabits per second you want the encoder to allow. The minimum bitrate differs according to the format. For MPEG2‑DVD, the minimum bitrate must be at least 1.5 Mbps.

Target Bitrate [Mbps]

Specifies the number of megabits per second (Mbps) you want the encoded file to have.

Maximum Bitrate [Mbps]

Specifies the maximum number of megabits per second you want the encoder to allow.

M Frames

Specifies the number of B frames (bi‑directional frames) between consecutive I frames (intra‑frames) and P frames (predicted frames). This option is available only for MPEG formats.

N Frames

Specifies the number of frames between I frames (intra‑frames). This value must be a multiple of the M frames value. This option is available only for MPEG formats.

Closed GOP Every

Specifies the frequency of each Closed Group of Pictures (Closed GOP), which can’t reference frames outside of the closed GOP. A GOP consists of a sequence of I, B, and P frames. (This option is available when you choose either of the Multimedia Compatible presets (MPEG1 Multimedia Compatible or MPEG2 Multimedia Compatible) from the Export MPEG dialog box, and then click Advanced.)

Automatic GOP Placement

When selected, sets the placement of Group of Pictures (GOP) automatically. (This option is available when you choose either of the MPEG Multimedia Compatible presets from the Export MPEG dialog box, and then click Advanced.)

note: MPEG‑1 and MPEG‑2 formats include numerous advanced options not listed here. In most cases, selecting a format or preset designed for your target output sets the appropriate options automatically. For detailed information on options not listed, consult the industry specifications for the MPEG‑1 and MPEG‑2 formats.

Audio settings

The following options are available in the Audio panel of the Export Settings dialog box (you see these when you share a project using the Computer or Mobile Phones And Players options). Not all options are available for all presets.

Audio Format

Specifies the type of audio output, such as AAC or MP3, and may determine which audio codec is used.

Audio Codec

Specifies the codec for Premiere Elements to apply when compressing audio. The codecs available depend on the file type you specified in the General panel in the Export Settings dialog box. Some file types and capture cards support only uncompressed audio, which has the highest quality, but uses more disk space. Check with your capture card’s documentation before choosing an audio codec.

Sample Rate

Specifies the rate for export. Choose a higher rate for better audio quality in an exported file, or choose a lower rate to reduce processing time and disk‑space requirements. CD quality is 44.1 kHz. Resampling, setting a different rate than the original audio, also requires additional processing time. Avoid resampling by capturing audio at the final rate.

Sample Type

Specifies the bit depth for export. Choose a higher bit depth and stereo for better quality, or choose a lower bit depth and mono to reduce processing time and disk‑space requirements. CD quality is 16‑bit stereo.

Channels

Specifies how many audio channels are in the exported file. By default, stereo provides two channels of audio; mono provides one. If you choose to export a stereo track as mono, the audio will be down mixed.

Interleave

Specifies how often audio information is inserted among the video frames in the exported file. See your capture card documentation for the recommended setting. A value of 1 frame means that when a frame is played back, the audio for the duration of that frame is loaded into RAM so that it can play until the next frame appears. If the audio breaks up when playing, the interleave value may be causing the computer to process audio more frequently than it can handle. Increasing the value lets Premiere Elements store longer audio segments that need to be processed less often, although higher interleave values require more RAM. Most current hard disks operate best with 1/2‑ to 1‑second interleaves.

Bitrate

Specifies the number of megabits per second you want the encoded file to have. Generally, higher bitrates increase both quality and file size. This option is available for AAC, MPEG, and some Windows Media Audio codecs.

note: Options not documented here are specific to the selected format. For detailed information, consult the industry specifications for the selected format.

Bitrate Mode

Specifies whether the codec achieves a constant or variable bitrate in the exported file. Constant keeps the data rate of the exported file constant within a fixed limit you specify. Since the complex sections are held to the same bitrate as the simple, they are more likely to show the quality-degrading artifacts of compression. Variable allows the exported file’s data rate to vary within a range you specify, allocating higher bitrates, and therefore less compression, to the more complex sections and lower bitrates to the less complex.

In general, a frame is complex and more difficult to compress efficiently if it contains great detail, or if it significantly differs from surrounding frames, as it would in a scene containing motion.

note: When comparing CBR and VBR files of the same content and file size, a CBR file may play back more reliably over a wider range of systems, because a fixed data rate is less demanding on a media player and computer processor. However, a VBR file tends to have a higher image quality, because VBR tailors the amount of compression to the image content.

Encoding Passes

Specifies the number of times the encoder analyzes the clip before encoding. Multiple passes increase the time it takes to encode the file, but generally result in more efficient compression and higher image quality.

note: Options not documented here are specific to the selected format. For detailed information, consult the industry specifications for the selected format.

Multiplexing settings

Multiplexing combines multiple data streams into one signal. Some formats, such as Apple iPod, include one or more of the following Multiplexing options:

Multiplexing

Specifies the type of multiplexing you want to use. Choose the format from which you plan to playback the video: DVD, 3GPP, or MP4. If you don’t want to use multiplexing, choose None.

Stream Compatibility

Specifies the media from which the video will be played back: PSP (PlayStation Portable), iPod, or Standard.

Activate a component for sharing

Premiere Elements includes a number of components, such as codecs, that must be activated the first time you use them. For example, the first time you try to export to a certain format, you may be asked to activate a component.

If you are connected to the Internet, component activation occurs automatically. If you are not connected to the Internet, the Activating Component dialog box appears.

  1. When the Activating Component dialog box appears, connect to the Internet.
  2. In the Activating Component dialog box, click Copy to copy the serial number.
  3. Click the URL to go to the activation website.
  4. Paste the serial number into the ID box on the website.
  5. Select your Country/Region and product; and then click Submit.

    The activation website displays an unlock key.

  6. Copy the unlock key, paste it in the Activating Component dialog box, and then click OK.
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