Backwards effect

The Backwards effect reverses the audio of a layer by playing the audio from the last frame to the first frame. The frames remain in their original order in the Timeline panel. Select Swap Channels to swap left and right channels.

Harry Frank and Aharon Rabinowitz provide a video tutorial on the All Bets Are Off website that shows how to use the Backwards effect and the Reverb effect to create a creepy reverse echo result.

Bass & Treble effect

The Bass & Treble effect boosts (increases) or cuts (decreases) the low frequencies (bass) or the high frequencies (treble) of the audio. For greater control, use the Parametric EQ effect.

Delay effect

The Delay effect repeats audio after a specified amount of time. This effect simulates sound bouncing off a surface, such as a wall.

To simulate the acoustic ambience of a room, use the Reverb effect.

Delay Time

Time between the original sound and its echo, in milliseconds.

Delay Amount

Volume of the first delayed audio, as a fraction of the original.

Feedback

Amount of the echo that is fed back into the delay line to create subsequent echoes.

Dry Out, Wet Out

The amounts of the original (dry) sound and delayed (wet) sound in the final output. Values of 50% are commonly used.

Flange & Chorus effect

Flange is an audio effect caused by mixing the original audio with a copy that is delayed by a varying amount that cycles over time. The frequency of the copy is also offset by an amount related to the delay. Chorus uses a larger delay, to make one voice or instrument sound like many.

The default settings for the Flange & Chorus effect are for flange. To create a chorus result, use values something like the following: 40 for Voice Separation Time (or higher for a greater chorus result), 4 for Voices, 0.1 for Modulation Rate, 50% for Modulation Depth, and 90 for Voice Phase Change, with Stereo Voices selected.

Voice Separation Time

The time in milliseconds that separates each voice. Each voice is a delayed version of the original sound. Use values of 6 or lower for flange, and higher values for chorus.

Voices

The number of voices in the processed (wet) audio.

Modulation Rate

The rate in Hz at which the modulation cycles.

Modulation Depth

The amount of modulation.

Voice Phase Change

The modulation phase difference in degrees between each subsequent voice. Divide 360 by the number of voices to find the optimum value.

Invert Phase

Inverts the phase of the processed (wet) audio, emphasizing more of the high frequencies; not inverting the phase emphasizes more of the low frequencies.

Stereo Voices

Alternates assignment of voices to one of the two channels so that the first voice appears in the left channel, the second in the right channel, the third in the left, and so on. To hear stereo voices, preview or render in stereo.

Dry Out, Wet Out

The amounts of the original (dry) sound and delayed (wet) sound in the final output. Values of 50% are commonly used.

High-Low Pass effect

The High-Low Pass effect sets a limit above or below which frequencies can pass. High Pass allows frequencies above the limit and blocks frequencies below. Conversely, Low Pass allows frequencies below the limit and blocks frequencies above. Use High-Low Pass to do the following:

  • Enhance or attenuate (reduce) a sound. For example, using High Pass can reduce traffic noise, which often is concentrated at low frequencies, while minimally affecting a voice recording. Using Low Pass can remove high-frequency sounds, such as static and buzzing.

  • Change the focus from one sound to another over time. For example, in audio that contains both music and voice, you can fade out the music while gradually bringing in the voice.

  • Protect equipment from potentially damaging frequencies.

  • Direct certain frequencies to specific equipment. For example, use Low Pass to isolate sounds intended for a subwoofer.

Note:

To check the frequencies that you filter out, switch to the opposite Filter Options value and preview audio.

Cutoff Frequency

All frequencies below (High Pass) or above (Low Pass) are removed. If the unwanted sound changes over time, animate this property.

Note:

To identify the frequencies of unwanted sound, use the Audio Spectrum effect.

Dry Out, Wet Out

The amounts of the original (dry) sound and delayed (wet) sound in the final output. Common values for removing frequencies are 0% for Dry Out and 100% for Wet Out.

Modulator effect

The Modulator effect adds both vibrato and tremolo to audio by modulating (varying) the frequency and amplitude.

Modulation Type

The type of waveform to use. Sine produces smoother modulation. Triangle produces more abrupt modulation.

Modulation Rate

The rate in Hz of the modulation.

Modulation Depth

The amount of frequency modulation.

Amplitude Modulation

The amount of amplitude modulation.

Parametric EQ effect

The Parametric EQ effect emphasizes or attenuates specific frequency ranges. Parametric EQ is useful for enhancing music, such as boosting low frequencies to bring up bass.

If you have audio with an unwanted sound (such as a beep from a forklift in the background), you can isolate and cut the frequency range of the beep to attenuate the sound.

Using this effect, you can enhance up to three different bands of audio. As you adjust controls, a frequency-response graph indicates the combined equalization curve you create; band 1 is red, band 2 is green, and band 3 is blue. You may find it easier to specify controls if you determine in advance the frequency-response curve you want.

Note:

To identify the frequencies of unwanted sound, use the Audio Spectrum effect.

Band Enabled

Activates an equalization band and its controls.

Frequency

The center of the frequency band to modify.

Bandwidth

The width of the frequency band to modify.

Boost/Cut

The amount by which to boost (increase) or cut (decrease) the amplitude of the frequencies inside the specified band. Positive values boost; negative values cut.

Reverb effect

The Reverb effect simulates a spacious or acoustically live interior by simulating random reflections of a sound off a surface.

Harry Frank and Aharon Rabinowitz provide a video tutorial on the All Bets Are Off website that shows how to use the Backwards effect and the Reverb effect to create a creepy reverse echo result.

Reverb Time

The average time, in milliseconds, between the original audio and the reverberated audio.

Diffusion

Specifies how much the effect scatters the original audio. More diffusion can make the audio sound farther from the microphone.

Decay

Specifies the amount of time it takes for the effect to subside. A higher value simulates a larger space.

Brightness

Specifies the amount of detail preserved from the original audio. High brightness simulates a room with live (highly reflective) acoustics.

Dry Out, Wet Out

The amounts of the original (dry) sound and delayed (wet) sound in the final output. Values of 50% are commonly used.

Stereo Mixer effect

The Stereo Mixer effect mixes the left and right channels of audio and pans the entire signal from one channel to the other.

Invert Phase

Inverts the phase of both channels of the stereo signal. Use this control to prevent two sounds at the same frequency from canceling each other out.

Tone effect

The Tone effect synthesizes simple audio tones to create sounds, such as the low rumble of a submarine, a telephone ringing in the background, sirens, or a laser blast. You can have up to five tones for each instance of the Tone effect, to create a chord. When you apply this effect to a layer with audio, the dry (original, unprocessed) audio is ignored, and only the tone plays.

You can also apply the Tone effect to a layer that has no audio, such as a solid layer, to synthesize audio.

Note:

The Tone effect doesn’t generate audio on a placeholder layer; for the effect to generate audio, replace the placeholder with a footage item.

Waveform Options

Specifies the type of waveform to use. Sine waves produce the purest tones. Square waves produce the most distorted tones. Triangle waves have elements of both sine waves and square waves but are closer to sine waves. Saw waves have elements of both sine waves and square waves but are closer to square waves.

Frequency

Frequency in Hz. To turn off a tone, set its frequency to 0.0.

Level

Changes the amplitude of all tones in this instance of the effect. To avoid clipping and popping, use a Level value that is no greater than 100 divided by the number of frequencies you use. For example, if you use all five frequencies, specify 20%.

Note:

To avoid clicks at the end of a tone, set a keyframe for the desired Level value at the frame immediately before the end of the tone, and then set a keyframe for a Level value of 0.0 at the end of the tone. This technique works well for any audio that you end abruptly.

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