Adobe uses machine learning technologies, such as content analysis and pattern recognition, to improve our products and services. For example, features such as Content-Aware Fill in Photoshop and facial recognition in Lightroom could be refined using machine learning.

If you prefer that Adobe not analyze your files to improve our products and services, you can turn off machine learning at any time from your Adobe Account Management page.

What is machine learning?

Machine learning is used in many of the apps and services you interact with every day. It is simply a term to describe how a computer analyzes data and then makes predictions or provides suggestions, based on what it learns.

As a general example of machine learning, an email application can automatically move all messages from a particular sender to your Spam folder. The computer analyzes the data included in your emails and predicts, from the patterns it discovers, the likelihood that messages from a particular sender or domain are spam. It then takes action on that prediction and moves the messages out of your Inbox.

When you tag a message as "junk," the computer can learn from that and get better at automatically flagging junk mail. Over time, the computer can take more data into account to get better and better at a particular task. This process of improving through experience is machine learning.

What are the benefits of machine learning?

With machine learning, the programs and devices you use get better at providing you a personalized service over time. The more you use voice recognition software, for example, the better the software understands your voice and the better it works.

At Adobe, we can use machine learning to help you be more efficient and creative. For example, we may use machine learning to help you organize and edit your images. With object recognition in Lightroom, we could auto-tag all photos of your dog. In Photoshop, machine learning could help us identify images that may be too dark and auto-adjust the brightness for you.

We could also use machine learning to make content-aware suggestions. For example, if you are working on a UI mockup, Photoshop might automatically suggest stock button icons. This type of content-aware suggestion can become more relevant to your work when Photoshop learns from your data, rather than generic data available on the Internet.

What data do you look at and how do you use it?

The computer may analyze your content when you send, receive, or store files using our cloud services. We do not access the files stored locally on your computer. We use data in your files, activity logs, and direct feedback from you to train and improve our algorithms.

For example, we may use pattern recognition on your photographs to identify all images of dogs and auto-tag them for you. If you select one of those photographs and indicate that it does not include a dog, we use that information to get better at identifying images of dogs.

We use what we learn from all Adobe users to make our products and services better for everyone. For example, if you edit beach photos to look saturated and vibrant and another user edits wedding photos to have a soft focus and soft light, then our programs can learn those differences. Later, when a third user edits a beach or wedding photo, we can give them the appropriate style suggestions, based on what we learned from you and other users.

You can find an overview of how Adobe may use information associated with you in the Adobe Privacy Center.

How do you access my content for machine learning?

The computer may analyze your content when you send, receive, or store files using our cloud services. We do not access the files stored locally on your computer. 

How will you protect my privacy?

Adobe takes your privacy seriously. The insights obtained through machine learning cannot be used to re-create your content or any personal information.

You can find an overview of how Adobe may use information associated with you in the Adobe Privacy Center.

Can I turn off (opt out of) machine learning?

If you prefer that Adobe not analyze your files to take action and make suggestions, you can turn off machine learning at any time.

  1. Access your Adobe account online, and sign in with your Adobe ID and password.

    Note:

    Your Adobe ID is the email address you used when you first purchased an Adobe membership, application, or service.

  2. Click Security & Privacy at the top of the page.

  3. Under Privacy, click Manage.

  4. Under Machine learning, deselect the check box next to Yes, allow my content to be analyzed by Adobe using machine learning techniques.

  5. Click Save.

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