Note:

For detailed instructions, click the links below. To ask questions, request features, or report problems, visit feedback.photoshop.com.

Type in Adobe Photoshop consists of vector-based type outlines—mathematically defined shapes that describe the letters, numbers, and symbols of a typeface. Many typefaces are available in more than one format, the most common formats being Type 1 (also called PostScript fonts), TrueType, OpenType, New CID, and CID nonprotected (Japanese only).

Photoshop preserves vector-based type outlines and uses them when you scale or resize type, save a PDF or EPS file, or print the image to a PostScript printer. As a result, it’s possible to produce type with crisp, resolution-independent edges.

Note:

If you import bitmap type layers created in older versions of Photoshop or Photoshop Elements, choose Type > Update All Text Layers to convert to vector type.

About type layers

Note:

Type layers aren’t created for images in Multichannel, Bitmap, or Indexed Color mode, because these modes don’t support layers. In these modes, type appears on the background as rasterized text.

When you create type, a new type layer is added to the Layers panel. After you create a type layer, you can edit the type and apply layer commands to it.

Once you make a change to a type layer that requires it to be rasterized, however, Photoshop converts the vector-based type outlines to pixels. Rasterized type no longer has vector outlines and is uneditable as type. See Rasterize type layers.

You can make the following changes to a type layer and still edit the type:

  • Change the orientation of type.
  • Apply anti-aliasing.
  • Convert between point type and paragraph type.
  • Create a work path from type.
  • Apply transformation commands from the Edit menu, except for Perspective and Distort.  

Note:

To transform part of the type layer, you must first rasterize the type layer.

  • Use layer styles.

  • Use fill shortcuts (see Keys for painting).

  • Warp type to conform to a variety of shapes.

Entering type

There are three ways to create type: at a point, inside a paragraph, and along a path.

  • Point type is a horizontal or vertical line of text that begins where you click in the image. Entering text at a point is a useful way to add a few words to your image.

  • Paragraph type uses boundaries to control the flow of characters, either horizontally or vertically. Entering text this way is useful when you want to create one or more paragraphs, such as for a brochure.

Point type, and type in a bounding box
Type entered as point type (top) and in a bounding box (bottom)

  • Type on a path flows along the edge of an open or a closed path. When you enter text horizontally, characters appear along the path perpendicular to the baseline. When you enter text vertically, characters appear along the path parallel to the baseline. In either case, the text flows in the direction in which points were added to the path.

    If you enter more text that can fit within a paragraph boundary or along a path, a small box or circle containing a plus symbol (+) appears in place of a handle in the corner of the boundary or anchor point at the end of the path.

Clicking in an image with a type tool puts the type tool in edit mode. When the tool is in edit mode, you can enter and edit characters as well as perform some other commands from the various menus; however, certain operations require that you first commit changes to the type layer. To determine whether a type tool is in edit mode, look in the options bar—if you see the Commit button  and the Cancel button , the type tool is in edit mode.

Enter point type

When you enter point type, each line of type is independent—the line expands or shrinks as you edit it, but it doesn’t wrap to the next line. The type you enter appears in a new type layer.

  1. Select the Horizontal Type tool  or the Vertical Type tool .
  2. Click in the image to set an insertion point for the type. The small line through the I‑beam marks the baseline of the type (the imaginary line on which type rests). For vertical type, the baseline marks the center axis of the characters.
  3. Select additional type options in the options bar, Character panel, or Paragraph panel.
  4. Enter the characters. To begin a new line, press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).

    Note:

    You can also transform point type while in edit mode. Hold down the Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS) key. A bounding box appears around the type. You can grab a handle to scale or skew the type. You can also rotate the bounding box.

  5. When you finish entering or editing the type, do one of the following:
    • Click the Commit button  in the options bar.

    • Press the Enter key on the numeric keypad.

    • Press Ctrl+Enter (Windows) or Command+Return (Mac OS).

    • Select any tool in the toolbox; click in the Layers, Channels, Paths, Actions, History, or Styles panel; or select any available menu command.

Enter paragraph type

When you enter paragraph type, the lines of type wrap to fit the dimensions of the bounding box. You can enter multiple paragraphs and select a paragraph justification option.

You can resize the bounding box, causing the type to reflow within the adjusted rectangle. You can adjust the bounding box while you enter type or after you create the type layer. You can also use the bounding box to rotate, scale, and skew type.

  1. Select the Horizontal Type tool  or the Vertical Type tool .
  2. Do one of the following:
    • Drag diagonally to define a bounding box for the type.

    • Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) as you click or drag to display the Paragraph Text Size dialog box. Enter values for Width and Height, and click OK.

  3. Select additional type options in the options bar, Character panel, Paragraph panel, or Layer > Type submenu.
  4. Enter the characters. To begin a new paragraph, press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS). If you enter more type than can fit in the bounding box, the overflow icon  appears on the bounding box.
  5. If desired, resize, rotate, or skew the bounding box.
  6. Commit the type layer by doing one of the following:
    • Click the Commit button  in the options bar.

    • Press the Enter key on the numeric keypad.

    • Press Ctrl+Enter (Windows) or Command+Return (Mac OS).

    • Select any tool in the toolbox; click in the Layers, Channels, Paths, Actions, History, or Styles panel; or select any available menu command.

The type you enter appears in a new type layer.

Paste lorem-ipsum placeholder text

Lorem-ipsum placeholder text lets you quickly fill a text block for layout purposes.

  1. Select a type tool, and click to insert the cursor in an existing text line or box.

  2. Choose Type > Paste Lorem Ipsum.

Resize or transform a type bounding box

  • Display the bounding box handles of paragraph type. With the Type tool  active, select the type layer in the Layers panel, and click in the text flow in the image.

    Note:

    You can transform point type while in edit mode. Hold down the Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS) key, and a bounding box appears around the type.

    • To resize the bounding box, position the pointer over a handle—the pointer turns into a double arrow —and drag. Shift-drag to maintain the proportions of the bounding box.

    • To rotate the bounding box, position the pointer outside the bounding border—the pointer turns into a curved, two‑sided arrow —and drag. Shift-drag to constrain the rotation to 15° increments. To change the center of rotation, Ctrl-drag (Windows) or Command-drag (Mac OS) the center point to a new location. The center point can be outside the bounding box.

    • To skew the bounding box, hold down Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS) and drag one of the middle handles. The pointer turns into an arrowhead .

    Skewing type
    Skewing type using the bounding box

    • To scale the type as you resize the bounding box, Ctrl-drag (Windows) or Command-drag (Mac OS) a corner handle.

    • To resize the bounding box from the center point, Alt-drag (Windows) or Option-drag (Mac OS) a corner handle.

Convert between point type and paragraph type

You can convert point type to paragraph type to adjust the flow of characters within a bounding box. Alternatively, you can convert paragraph type to point type to make each text line flow independently from the others. When you convert from paragraph type to point type, a carriage return is added at the end of each line of type (with the exception of the last line).

  1. Select the type layer in the Layers panel.
  2. Choose Type > Convert To Point Text or Type > Convert To Paragraph Text.

    Note:

    When you convert paragraph type to point type, all characters that overflow the bounding box are deleted. To avoid losing text, adjust the bounding box so that all type is visible prior to conversion.

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