Note:

For Photoshop versions earlier than Photoshop CC, some functionality discussed in this article may be available only if you have Photoshop Extended. Photoshop CC does not have a separate Extended offering. All features in Photoshop Extended are part of Photoshop CC.

Paint frames in video layers

You can edit or paint on individual video frames to create an animation, add content, or to remove unwanted details. In addition to using any brush tool, you can paint using the Clone Stamp, Pattern Stamp, Healing Brush, or Spot Healing Brush. You can also edit video frames using the Patch tool.

Note:

Painting (or using any other tool) on video frames is often called rotoscoping; although traditionally, rotoscoping involves the frame‑by‑frame tracing of live action images for use in animation.

  1. In the Timeline or Layers panel, select the video layer.

  2. Move the current time indicator to the video frame you want to edit.
  3. (Optional) If you want your edits to be on a separate layer, choose Layers > Video Layers > New Blank Video Layer.
  4. Select the brush tool that you want to use and apply your edits to the frame.

    Painting on a video layer is nondestructive. To discard the altered pixels on a specific frame or video layer, choose the Restore Frame or Restore All Frames command. To toggle on and off the visibility of altered video layers, choose the Hide Altered Video command (or click the eyeball next to the altered video track in the timeline).

Cloning content in video and animation frames

In Photoshop you can use the Clone Stamp and Healing Brush tools to retouch or duplicate objects in video or animation frames. Use the Clone Stamp to sample content from one part of a frame (the source) and paint it over another part of the same or different frame (the target). You can also use a separate document as the sampling source, instead of a frame. The Healing Brush includes options for blending the sampled content with the target frame.

Note:

You can also clone content with the Spot Healing Brush and the Patch tools. However, the Clone Stamp and the Healing Brush tools let you store up to five samples in the Clone Source panel, and set overlay, scaling, and frame offset options.

After you sample content from a frame and paint with it, and then move to another frame, the source frame changes relative to the frame you initially sampled from. You can lock in the source frame you first sampled, or enter a frame offset value to change the source to a different frame, relative to the frame you first sampled.

Clone video or animation content

  1. Select the Clone Stamp tool  or Healing Brush tool , and then set the tool options you want.
  2. Do one of the following:
    • Select a video layer in the Layers panel or Timeline panel, and then move the current-time indicator to the frame you want to sample.

    • Open the image you want to sample.

  3. Position the pointer in an open image or frame, and Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac OS) to set the sampling point.
  4. To set additional sampling points, click each clone source button  in the Clone Source panel.
  5. Select the target video layer and move the current-time indicator to the frame you want to paint.

    Note:

    If you want to paint on a separate layer, you can add a blank video layer. Make sure you choose the appropriate Sample option to clone content onto the blank video layer.

  6. If you have set multiple sampling points, select the source you want to use in the Clone Source panel.
  7. Do any of the following in the Clone Source panel:
    • To scale or rotate the source that you’re cloning, enter a value for W (width) or H (height), or the rotation in degrees .

    • To show an overlay of the source that you’re cloning, select Show Overlay and specify the overlay options. (The Clipped option restricts the overlay to the brush size. Deselect this option to overlay the entire source image).

    Note:

    To move the source overlay to an offset position, Shift + Alt-drag (Windows) or Shift + Option-drag (Mac OS). To temporarily show overlays, deselect Show Overlay, and press Shift + Alt (Windows) or Shift + Option (Mac OS).

  8. Drag over the area of the frame you want to paint.

    Painting on a video layer is nondestructive. You can choose the Restore Frame or Restore All Frames command to discard the altered pixels on a specific frame or video layer.

Change frame offset for cloning or healing

  • In the Clone Source panel:
    • To always paint using the same frame you initially sampled from, select Lock Frame.

    • To paint using a frame relative to the frame you initially sampled from, enter the number of frames in the Frame Offset box. If the frame you want to use is after the frame you initially sampled, enter a positive value. If the frame you want to use is before the frame you initially sampled, enter a negative value.

Restore frames in video layers

You can discard edits made to frame video layers and blank video layers.

  • In the Timeline panel, select a video layer and do one of the following:

    • To restore a specific frame, move the current-time indicator to the video frame and choose Layer > Video Layers > Restore Frame.

    • To restore all the frames in a video layer or blank video layer, choose Layer > Video Layers > Restore All Frames.

Managing color in video layers

In Photoshop you can paint on video layers using tools such as a brush tool or the Clone Stamp tool. If no color profile is assigned to the video layer, these pixel edits are stored using the document file’s color space, and the video footage itself is left unchanged. If the color space of the imported footage is different from the color space of your Photoshop document, you may need to make adjustments. For example, a standard definition video movie may be in SDTV 601 NTSC, while the Photoshop document is in Adobe RGB. Your final exported video or document might not have the colors you expect due to the color space mismatch.

Note:

Before investing a lot of time painting or editing video layers, test your complete workflow to understand your color management needs and find the approach that works best for your workflow.

Often, you can solve a mismatch by assigning a color profile to the document that corresponds to the imported footage, and leaving the video layer unmanaged. For example, with standard definition video, you can leave the video layer unmanaged and assign the document the SDTV (Rec. 601 NTSC) color profile. In this case, the imported frame pixels are stored directly in the video layer without color conversion.

Conversely, you can assign the document’s color profile to the video layer using the Convert Edited Frame Content option (Layers > Video Layers > Interpret Footage). This option converts the pixel edits to the document’s color space, but does not convert the colors of the video frames.

The Convert To Profile command (Edit > Convert To Profile) also converts all pixel edits to the document’s color space. However, using the Assign Profile command (Edit > Assign Profile) does not convert the pixel edits to a video layer. Use the Assign Profile command with care, especially when you’ve painted on or edited video frames. If the video layer has a color profile, applying the Assign Profile command to the document may cause a color space mismatch between the pixel edits and the imported frames.

Some combinations of video footage and document color spaces require color conversion:

  • A grayscale movie in an RGB, CMYK, or Lab mode document requires color conversion.

  • Using 8‑ or 16‑bpc footage in a 32‑bpc document requires color conversion.

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