Photoshop lets you easily adjust perspective in images. This feature is particularly useful for images having straight lines and flat surfaces—for example, architectural images and images of buildings. You can also use this feature to composite objects having different perspectives in a single image.

Background

Sometimes, an object may look different in an image from how it appears in real life. This mismatch is due to perspective distortion. Images of the same object captured from different camera distances and angles of view exhibit different perspective distortion.

Perspective distortion in images of the same object captured from different distances and angles

Prerequisite: Enable the graphics processor

Photoshop requires at least 512 MB of video RAM (VRAM) to run the perspective warp feature on 16-bit and 32-bit documents. For details, see Photoshop graphics processor (GPU) card FAQ.

As a prerequisite to adjusting perspective, ensure that the graphics processor is enabled in your Photoshop preferences.

  1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Performance.
  2. In the Graphics Processor Settings area, select Use Graphics Processor.
  3. Click Advanced Settings. Ensure that Use Graphics Processor To Accelerate Computation is selected.
  4. Click OK.

Adjust perspective

Define planes

Before you adjust perspective, you must define the planes of the architecture in the image:

  1. Open the image in Photoshop.
  2. Choose Edit > Perspective Warp. Review the onscreen tip and close it.
  3. Draw quads along the planes of the architecture in the image. While drawing the quads, try to keep their edges parallel to the straight lines in the architecture.
Photoshop adjust perspective
Draw the edges of the quads roughly parallel to the lines in the architecture. As depicted in the illustration, you can snap two planes together. Here is a set of planes defined for a building.

Manipulate the planes

  1. Switch to the Warp mode from the Layout mode.
Photoshop Warp mode
Warp mode

  1. Manipulate perspective in one of the available ways:
  • Move around the corners of the quads (pins) as appropriate. For example, you can adjust the perspective of this image, such that the two sides of the building exhibit foreshortening in equal measures. The resulting perspective would approximate a direct view of the building from a corner.
Photoshop Adjusting the perspective
Adjusting the perspective, such that the two sides of the building are equally foreshortened

  • Shift-click an individual edge of a quad to straighten it and keep it straight during further perspective manipulation. Such a straightened edge is highlighted in yellow in the Warp mode. You can manipulate the corners of the quads (pins) for finer control while adjusting perspective.
Photoshop straighten an individual edge
Shift-click to straighten an individual edge of a quad and keep it straight during further perspective manipulation. The rightmost selected edge in this image is highlighted in yellow.

Photoshop  selected edge straightened
The selected edge is straightened. Also, the straightening of the edge is preserved during further perspective manipulation.

Note:

Shift-click the edge again if you don't want to preserve its straightening.

  • In the Warp mode, you can click the following icons for automatic perspective adjustment:

          Automatically level near horizontal lines

Photoshop Level horizontally
Level horizontally

          Automatically straighten near vertical lines

Photoshop Straighten vertically
Straighten vertically

          Automatically straighten both vertically and horizontally

Photoshop Straighten horizontally and vertically
Straighten horizontally and vertically

  1. Once you're done adjusting the perspective, click the Commit Perspective Warp icon ().  

Keyboard shortcuts

The following keyboard shortcuts make it easier to adjust perspective:

Arrow keys

Slightly move a corner of a quad (pin)

H

Hides the grid when you're working in the Warp mode

L

Switches to the Layout mode

W

Switches to the Warp mode

Enter key

In the Layout mode, you can press the Enter key to quickly switch to the Warp mode. In the Warp mode, the Enter key commits the current changes to the perspective.

Shift-click

(Warp mode) Straightens an individual edge of a quad and keeps it straight during further perspective manipulation. If you don't want to preserve the straightening of the edge, Shift-click it again.

Shift-(drag an edge)

(Warp mode) Constrains the shape of a plane while lengthening it

FAQ

Can I edit different perspectives in the same image?

Yes. When you edit different perspectives in the same image, you can choose to:

  • Keep one part of the image having a certain perspective unchanged while adjusting the perspective for the rest of the image. To do so:
    1. Draw a quad around the part of the image whose perspective you want to preserve. Ensure that this quad is not snapped to any of the other planes whose perspective you're adjusting.
    2. Keep this quad unchanged while working with the other planes whose perspective you want to adjust.
  • Edit parts of the image having different perspectives independent of each other.
    1. Draw unconnected quads around the relevant parts of the image.
    2. Manipulate the quads independent of one another.

How much VRAM do I need to run the perspective warp feature?

Photoshop requires at least 512 MB of video RAM (VRAM) to run the perspective warp feature on 16-bit and 32-bit documents. If your GPU has 256 MB of VRAM, you can run the perspective warp feature only on 8-bit documents.

Also, the nVidia GeForce GT 120 video card isn't currently supported for the perspective warp feature.

The onscreen tips are no longer displaying. How do I bring them back?

Follow these steps:

  1. Choose Edit > Preferences > General.
  2. Click Reset All Warning Dialogs and then click OK.

Can I define different sets of planes for the same architecture?

Yes. As an illustration, here are two different ways of defining planes for the gateway to the Taj Mahal:

Photoshop planes
One quad drawn loosely around the architecture

Photoshop different set of planes
A different set of planes defined for the same architecture. This set of planes gives finer control over perspective adjustment.

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